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Itv Polled Viewers And 72% For Decriminalisation

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ITV Poll and Video

When the Association of Chief Police Officers' lead officer on prostitution called for a debate earlier this month on Britain's "frankly complicated" sex-trade laws, he reignited a simmering dispute on how to deal with the world's oldest profession.

The current laws which ban more than one prostitute working in a house at any one time may force women away from the safety provided in numbers and on to the streets.

But what is the answer? Should we legalise brothels? Should men who curb crawl be prosecuted? Or should we be ploughing more resources into getting vulnerable women off the street in the first place?

Today we're joined by Jade, an ex-prostitute who worked alongside victims of the Suffolk Strangler for ten years, Georgina Perry who runs an NHS service which seeks to get sex-workers off the street and broadcaster Ann Atkins who has strong moral views on the subject.

We asked you to vote in our poll: Should prostitution be completely decriminalised?

And here's how you voted: Yes 72% No 28%

http://thismorning.itv.com/thismorning/life/protection-prostitutes

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Now I have watched the video, the result of 72% supporting decriminalisation is a very good result, and not out align with lots of other polls from BBC, Economist and Mori . There were three speakers, two were very anti decriminalisation (Jade an ex street worker and anti Campaigner Ann Atkins) and looking for more laws to stop prostitution. Georgina Perry for the NHS was supporting decriminalisation. Despite the very negative speakers of Jade and Ann, it seems to the public that the reasoned arguments of Georgina held more credence to the public.

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Thanks for the info and the link, sir.

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We asked you to vote in our poll: Should prostitution be completely decriminalised?

And here's how you voted: Yes 72% No 28%

http://thismorning.i...ion-prostitutes

I've not watched the programme so excuse me if I've missed something that was in it, but surely decriminalisation of prostitution (essentially street work) is very different to legalising brothels etc?

Indeed complete decriminalisation of sex workers (coupled with the criminalisation of those who pay for sex) is at the top of the rad-fem agenda (as personified by Julie Bindle etc), so I don't really how this poll is helpful. :unsure:

(Unless of course, one assumes that the man/woman on the Clapham Omnibus believes that decriminalisation also includes legalisation/licensing of brothels etc.)

B

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I've not watched the programme so excuse me if I've missed something that was in it, but surely decriminalisation of prostitution (essentially street work) is very different to legalising brothels etc?

Indeed complete decriminalisation of sex workers (coupled with the criminalisation of those who pay for sex) is at the top of the rad-fem agenda (as personified by Julie Bindle etc), so I don't really how this poll is helpful. :unsure:

(Unless of course, one assumes that the man/woman on the Clapham Omnibus believes that decriminalisation also includes legalisation/licensing of brothels etc.)

B

Yes, you have missed something.

Decriminalisation of prostitution doesn't just refer to street work but is a policy whereby most, if not all, criminal charges associated with sex work would be abolished. For example, this would encapsulate such crimes as brothel keeping, controlling for gain and, potentially, soliciting but would stil leave in place such measures as those preventing those who are under-age being employed in the industry or the coecion of the workers. The actual sale and purchase of sexual services would remain, as they are now, perfectly legal activities.

Additionally, such legislation would have the effect of recognising sex work as being just that, work, and introduce the full range of health and safety and employment rights legislation into extablishments such as parlours and escort agencies; though one must bear in mind that the majority of those working in/on behalf of such establishments are actually classified as being self-employed.

A system similar to this has been implemented, with great success, in New Zealand.

The "complete decriminalisation of sex workers" under the "Swedish Model", as refered to by Bindel and the RadFems, isn't really decriminalisation at all. They have still lefft in place, and have in fact toughened up, both the solicitation and kerb-crawling laws (it is no longer required that persistence be demonstrated in either instance). By attempting to criminalise the purchase of sexual services, have effectively tried create a situation in which it is legal to for the seller to offer their services but illegal for anyone to purchase them; thus tending to drive the seller out of the industry. As has been seen in Sweden, there is an unspoken requirement that sex workers will be required to provide evidence against any client, who is to be presecuted under a law which criminalises purchase, and this requirement is often enforced by finding ways of criminalising the seller.

Therefore, it is pretty safe to say that Bindel and co. are actually looking to introduce further criminalisation of the industry, with everything else they say bing their usual smokescreen.

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I think that there is a problem in that a fair proportion of journalists use the 2 definitions interchangeably and often confuse the 2. It's also the case that people use different definitions.

As far as I am concerned,Decriminalisation means the repeal of the relevant criminal law(s) relating to prostitution. So in the case of brothels that would mean the repeal of sections 33 to 36 Sexual Offences 1956.

Legalisation means the use of criminal laws to regulate or control prostitution by imposing conditions and regulations, such as licensing of brothels or restrictions on the number of girls working.

Wikipedia states:

"Legalization is the process of removing a legal prohibition against something which is currently not legal."

"Legalization should be contrasted with decriminalization, which removes criminal charges from an action, but leaves intact associated laws and regulations."

Those definitions differ from mine.

I'm not in favour of the complete decriminalisation of the prostitution laws because that would include street soliciting and kerb-crawling. I think also that there needs to be some control over brothels. I would much prefer some element of legalisation rather than a complete "free for all".

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Yes, you have missed something.

No I don't think I have as Silverado's post makes clear (i.e. there's a difference between decriminalisation and legalisation).

The fact that there is room for ambiguity in the question posed (and that no doubt those proponents of the Swedish model to which you refer may well also be using it to demonstrate popular support their position) shows that we shouldn't all be throwing our hats in the air in celebration. :rolleyes:

B

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sorry to be pedantic but the question asked was: should prostitution be COMPLETELY decriminalised,this as has been pointed out is based on the new zealand model,the swedish model supposedly decriminalises the sex seller only(partial decriminalisation)

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The fact that people are supporting decriminalisation has no relevance to the Swedish model. The question did not suggest that men paying for sex should be prosecuted. Decriminalisation is not the problem with the Swedish model...it's the criminalisation of men that's the issue...and the question didn't mention that at all.

No I don't think I have as Silverado's post makes clear (i.e. there's a difference between decriminalisation and legalisation).

The fact that there is room for ambiguity in the question posed (and that no doubt those proponents of the Swedish model to which you refer may well also be using it to demonstrate popular support their position) shows that we shouldn't all be throwing our hats in the air in celebration. :rolleyes:

B

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The fact that people are supporting decriminalisation has no relevance to the Swedish model. The question did not suggest that men paying for sex should be prosecuted. Decriminalisation is not the problem with the Swedish model...it's the criminalisation of men that's the issue...and the question didn't mention that at all.

Agree, if I was an anti I would not have voted for decriminalisation of prostitution in this poll. I would know it would be interpreted as a vote for sale and purchase.

In anycase the two antis in the video were against decriminalisation as that sent out the message the prostitution was not 'bad'.

I agree with total decriminalsation. Decriminalisation does not mean no laws. There are still laws which can be applied to brothels. Running businesses from homes where there are lots of visitors would be covered by planning permission, mortgage and insurance constraints, local constrains on running business. Heath and saftey, employment and contract law.

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The fact that people are supporting decriminalisation has no relevance to the Swedish model. The question did not suggest that men paying for sex should be prosecuted. Decriminalisation is not the problem with the Swedish model...it's the criminalisation of men that's the issue...and the question didn't mention that at all.

But decriminalisation of sex workers (where applicable) and criminalisation of men who pay for sex are joined at the hip as far as the antis are concerned.

B

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But decriminalisation of sex workers (where applicable) and criminalisation of men who pay for sex are joined at the hip as far as the antis are concerned.

B

Yes but not within the ITV question as far as I'm aware. It spoke of decriminalisation of the sex industry, not "decriminalisation for women and criminalisation for men"

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