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The Medic

Plasma Vs Lcd Vs Led

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I need to buy a new TV and would appreciate some advice on which one to go for? Also advice on where to bag a bargain would be appreciated.

Thank you in advance.

The Medic

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I need to buy a new TV and would appreciate some advice on which one to go for? Also advice on where to bag a bargain would be appreciated.

Thank you in advance.

The Medic

I recommend a LCD that is 1080 HD ready. In my experience Plasmas havent as good a picture especially when broadcasting sports and things outside, there are often flaws in the picture.

Google LCD and check out the links. Mags like What TV or similar are worth looking at to get an idea. With makes like Sony you really are paying more than you need to just because its Sony, Toshiba and Panasonic are genrally as good but cost less. Shops like Argos are quite cheap and so are some supermarkets offering unheard of brands sometimes at bargain prices.

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Any idea on budget and screen size you want yet? Samsung and panasonic are good brands. I've always had Plasmas but recently bought a slim Samsung LED TV and it is stunning.

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Thinking of getting a 42" and seen an ad for Toshiba LED @ £450 from Best Buy

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Thinking of getting a 42" and seen an ad for Toshiba @ £450

I have had about 30 Toshiba TVs over the years and never had a problem with any of them. Just do a bit of surfing using this TVs model number and see what others are selling it for.

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I have had about 30 Toshiba TVs over the years and never had a problem with any of them. Just do a bit of surfing using this TVs model number and see what others are selling it for.

The one I have seen is: Toshiba 42SL738B 42" LED Full HD 1080p TV and prices range from £520 down to £450

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The biggest impact on picture quality depends on if it 1080p or 1080i. You want 1080p sometimes called FULL HD, 1080i is not FULL HD and is usually marketed as HD Ready. This means it accepts a HD signal but only displays it interlaced, it updates alternative lines on each frame and you can really tell the difference with water, clouds textures, sports and fast moving action. Just remember the i really does stands for inferior. If you bought 1080i there is no point using Blueray the picture displayed will be no better than a DVD.

Plasma are the cheapest to buy, have the poorest colour depth and consumes about twice as much power as LCD or LED. LCD is the middle ground, decent all round. LED offers easily the very best colour depth and the lowest power consumption but are the most expensive to buy.

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Plasma are the cheapest to buy, have the poorest colour depth and consumes about twice as much power as LCD or LED. LCD is the middle ground, decent all round. LED offers easily the very best colour depth and the lowest power consumption but are the most expensive to buy.

Nonsense. Read the reviews of the V20 series Panasonic plasmas and weep (they're noted for their cinematic colours, deep blacks and general perfection). LED backlighting is a marketing gimmick which results in poorer quality than the previous generation CCFL backlights (which aren't without faults... LCD and LED TVs use the same or similar panel technology.)

The only way that a LED display trumps either CCFL backlit or plasma displays is with regard to energy efficiency and physical depth of the actual display. In most other respects they are worse including 'colour depth', clouding and inconsistent blacks (an area in which probably no LCD based screen will ever beat a plasma screen).

B

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The biggest impact on picture quality depends on if it 1080p or 1080i. You want 1080p sometimes called FULL HD, 1080i is not FULL HD and is usually marketed as HD Ready. This means it accepts a HD signal but only displays it interlaced, it updates alternative lines on each frame and you can really tell the difference with water, clouds textures, sports and fast moving action. Just remember the i really does stands for inferior. If you bought 1080i there is no point using Blueray the picture displayed will be no better than a DVD.

Plasma are the cheapest to buy, have the poorest colour depth and consumes about twice as much power as LCD or LED. LCD is the middle ground, decent all round. LED offers easily the very best colour depth and the lowest power consumption but are the most expensive to buy.

Sorry, but a lot of this is simply wrong.

1080p, 1080i etc.

1080i TVs are extremely rare these days. It was only really applicable when 1080 HD TVs were first becoming available and was pretty quickly superceeded by 1080p.

The slightly more common inferior resolution is 720p, which is often referred to as 'HD Ready'. Again though, any brand new decent sized TV will most likely be 1080p - know as 'Full HD'.

When it comes to HD content, most HD freeview content is actually 1080i anyway - BBC HD programmes are 1080i, not 1080p. So 1080i wouldn't actually make a difference.

Also, Bluray outputs at a maximum resolution of 1080p, however it can also easily be set to output at 1080i, or 720p. Both of those resolutions are superior to standard definition DVD, and so you would still notice a definite difference.

However, this is all moot, as if you are buying a new TV you should only be considering 1080p.

Plasma & LCD

Plasma's are the display of choice for most cinefiles. In a good plasma the blacks are deeper and the colours more vibrant. Also motion is handled far better, so sport will look much smoother on a plasma. Anyone saying otherwise is simply wrong. They are also cheaper, especially in screen sizes of 50' and over where plasma is your only realistic choice.

On the downsides, the screens are heavier, they consume far more power and there is a slight risk of image retention (though this drawback has been significantly reduced with newer models). They also have reflective screens, so you need to ensure that light doesn't fall directly on the screen - this is the only plasma issue that bothers me, and something you need to be aware of. A plasma screen in a sun-drenched kitchen will look poor. A plasma screen in a darkened room with the curtains drawn will look absolutely spectacular.

Many people misunderstand the differences between LCD and LED TVs. They actually use the same LCD panel technology - the only thing different is the backlight. 'LCD' TVs use the older CCFL backlight, whilst 'LED' TVs use the newer LED backlights. Both are actually LCD TVs.

LED backlights being a relatively new technology, most sets will usually have some problems - usually with 'banding' issues. This is because the backlight will not be spread evenly over the screen, and so the image will have bands or patches which are lighter/darker than the rest of the screen. For example this a common complaint with the most recent Sony LED TVs.

As CCFL TVs are a more mature technology, this kind of uneven backlight issue is rarer.

On the positive side, LED TVs are very slim (for that wow factor) and have very low power consumption. In theory they should have better colour reproduction and blacks than CCFL (though this is not always true, and either way the difference is often negligible), but they will never beat plasma quality.

There is a very good comparison of the 3 technologies here:

http://asia.cnet.com...85379.htm#page3

Links

I would definitely recommend a plasma. LED TVs get attention because they are a new technology and are super slim, and so have that wow factor. However if you are interested in picture quality over form factor, then plasma is the best choice.

The definitive forums for this are the AV forums. Ask for help there, and you should get some excellent advice. There are some very knowledgeable people there:

http://www.avforums....v-should-i-buy/

Places to bag bargains:

http://www.hotukdeal...isual/deals/hot

Whatever you get, make sure it is Full HD (1080p). I'd also recommend that you get one with a Freeview HD tuner built in. I'd also recommend getting a screen slightly bigger than what you think will be adequate - people often underestimate the appropriate screen size for a room.

Personal recommendations would be a 50' Panasonic G20 plasma, or the LG PK590 plasma. Either go for about £650.

The only way to determine if a TV is good or not is to check the reviews. Ignore the stats that manufacturers come out with, and google for reviews. Techradar, cnet, digitalversus and HDTV test are pretty good. AV forum's own reviews are good too (though a little out of date).

Happy hunting!

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On the downsides, the screens are heavier, they consume far more power and there is a slight risk of image retention (though this drawback has been significantly reduced with newer models). They also have reflective screens, so you need to ensure that light doesn't fall directly on the screen - this is the only plasma issue that bothers me, and something you need to be aware of. A plasma screen in a sun-drenched kitchen will look poor. A plasma screen in a darkened room with the curtains drawn will look absolutely spectacular.

Yup, the reflective screen can be a pain on a sunny day when sunlight falls on the screen, as you say though in a darkened room the image quality is spectacular, even on SD material and DVD (and in my opinion thanks to the rich blacks the image has far greater depth than you'll get from an LCD TV).

Personal recommendations would be a 50' Panasonic G20 plasma, or the LG PK590 plasma. Either go for about £650.

To add to the G20 recommendation above, I'd add the 42" Panasonic V20. It's a good time to buy at the moment as the 2011 models have just been released and if you're not into 3D then both the G20 and V20 should be available at a good price. I'd seriously consider purchasing from John Lewis as all their flat screen TVs come with a five year warranty.

B

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I have had about 30 Toshiba TVs over the years and never had a problem with any of them. Just do a bit of surfing using this TVs model number and see what others are selling it for.

Why?

I replace my TV every now and again, usually because of new technology or because of a fault or split up in a relationship.

So, over the last 30 years of buying, probably, 4 or 5.

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Agree with the points made by bacchus and the others. Plasmas are good especially for standard channels on Sky or Freeview. I had a Pioneer Plasma (not made anymore) and bought a 2011 range Samsung LCD/LED, which is about £1800 to get the same quality.

Like others say if you see a model you like within your price range then check out avforums to see people's comments. If you have Costco membership then they also offer a good 5 year guarantee for free and have some good offers on.

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Thank you everyone for the feedback. I will be searching reviews and visiting shops to see whats what. Will keep you all posted.

Thank you

Medic

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I like the picture on my sanyo crt telly in the bedroom. i prefer the quality of the picture on CRT.

downstairs I have a goodmans. Its crap. the tuner is poor and it breaks up a lot.

yes i have a good modern ariel.

hopefully things will be better when sutton coldfield goes properly digital in september.

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Definitely good advice from bacchus and Jimmy Dond. Just bought a new TV myself and my Dad bought a 42" a few months ago. I got a Samsung UE32C5800 which I'm pretty happy with. One point I will make of LED over previous CCFL backlit LCD's is the light bleed around the edge. There is virtually none that I can see on my LED LCD (Just a fine amount in the four corners when closely inspected on a black screen) as opposed to my old LCD TV which had noticeable bleeding around the edges during dark pictures. Standard definition Freeview is also very good something that quite a few LCD TV's don't always do very well and if your main viewing is of Freeview then that may be an important factor. I also bought from John Lewis which offer a 5 year guarantee on all their TVs and they have a good reputation and prices for like for like TVs are usually the same as places like Currys.

My Father bought a TX-P42G20B which is much better than any of the LCDs that we've seen so I'd most certainly go with the plasma if you can afford it.

Other than reviews try to think about some of the things you expect and would like the TV to provide. Things to check are the remote and how simple is it to use. Also check the TV menu system, my Samsung is pretty good but although my Dad's Panasonic is far better picture the menu system is a little sluggish and a bit over complex than is necessary. Will you be fixing it to the wall if so check the VESA fittings before you buy a wall fitting. Also make sure it has the connections you require for any current appliances you have (eg SCART for old DVD players, enough HDMIs for consoles and media players) and any appliances you may get in the future. Many TVs come with the capability to connect to the internet, check out exactly what this will do. Often they will have Youtube, BBC Iplayer, Flicker and a few others. They are all different though and like my Samsung may not actually connect to the internet as mine only had DNLA (allows me to connect to my PC and play videos and view photos) for some reason which is just ok.

Also good for reviews is Youtube, if you're lucky someone may have given an unboxing review of the TV you're interested in.

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Definitely good advice from bacchus and Jimmy Dond. Just bought a new TV myself and my Dad bought a 42" a few months ago. I got a Samsung UE32C5800 which I'm pretty happy with. One point I will make of LED over previous CCFL backlit LCD's is the light bleed around the edge. There is virtually none that I can see on my LED LCD (Just a fine amount in the four corners when closely inspected on a black screen) as opposed to my old LCD TV which had noticeable bleeding around the edges during dark pictures. Standard definition Freeview is also very good something that quite a few LCD TV's don't always do very well and if your main viewing is of Freeview then that may be an important factor. I also bought from John Lewis which offer a 5 year guarantee on all their TVs and they have a good reputation and prices for like for like TVs are usually the same as places like Currys.

My Father bought a TX-P42G20B which is much better than any of the LCDs that we've seen so I'd most certainly go with the plasma if you can afford it.

Other than reviews try to think about some of the things you expect and would like the TV to provide. Things to check are the remote and how simple is it to use. Also check the TV menu system, my Samsung is pretty good but although my Dad's Panasonic is far better picture the menu system is a little sluggish and a bit over complex than is necessary. Will you be fixing it to the wall if so check the VESA fittings before you buy a wall fitting. Also make sure it has the connections you require for any current appliances you have (eg SCART for old DVD players, enough HDMIs for consoles and media players) and any appliances you may get in the future. Many TVs come with the capability to connect to the internet, check out exactly what this will do. Often they will have Youtube, BBC Iplayer, Flicker and a few others. They are all different though and like my Samsung may not actually connect to the internet as mine only had DNLA (allows me to connect to my PC and play videos and view photos) for some reason which is just ok.

Also good for reviews is Youtube, if you're lucky someone may have given an unboxing review of the TV you're interested in.

id check for an rgb so you can hook your computer to it...

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Things change so quickly in TV technology, you really have to do your research. Others above have given some very good advice but I thought I'd share one small observation....

When I bought a new TV about 10 months ago, I did loads of research and visited several stores (high street, specialist and two John Lewis branches) to actually see the picture quality myself with various sources e.g. HD, Freeview and Blu-Ray.

I ended up going for a 37" Samsung LCD which at the time was getting rave reviews in the AV press. When I asked the various shop assistants what TV they had themselves, every single one said they owned a Panasonic plasma. I think that says something but even so I still preferred the Samsung.

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Things change so quickly in TV technology, you really have to do your research. Others above have given some very good advice but I thought I'd share one small observation....

When I bought a new TV about 10 months ago, I did loads of research and visited several stores (high street, specialist and two John Lewis branches) to actually see the picture quality myself with various sources e.g. HD, Freeview and Blu-Ray.

I ended up going for a 37" Samsung LCD which at the time was getting rave reviews in the AV press. When I asked the various shop assistants what TV they had themselves, every single one said they owned a Panasonic plasma. I think that says something but even so I still preferred the Samsung.

What i have found over the years is staff in Currys or Comet for example havent a clue about the detail of the TVs they are selling, there expertise has been poor in general which is why i have often gone to specialists although i might not buy the TV from them dependent on the price.

With my TVs its so rare they go wrong nowadays but i have a blanket electrical insurance policy that covers white goods as well just in case, it costs more overall as its a monthly premium for ever and Plasmas are excluded but its piece of mind. I used to have 5 year warranties on TVs among other electrical equipment from Tempo which i rated as an eletrical retailer till they went out of business.

As i said earlier i havent rated Plasmas and have found LCDs better so stick to them for now. There has been some great information on this thread by Jimmy Bond and a few others, very interesting. :)

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Why?

I replace my TV every now and again, usually because of new technology or because of a fault or split up in a relationship.

So, over the last 30 years of buying, probably, 4 or 5.

Only just seen this post so apoligies for the delay in posting. Different personal and business premises is why the amount of TVs.

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Only just seen this post so apoligies for the delay in posting. Different personal and business premises is why the amount of TVs.

On a related note, I'm intending to buy a new telly, but a second one, just for a bedroom, so I don't want to buy a very expensive one, as I'm pretty happy with my main one. I saw at Tesco homestores yesterday, a 32in LG for around £250. It was full HD (1080p), and it had something called 24p full cinema mode, so it all seems good. The only thing I didn't see was 100HZ, which I think is quite important, for rendering of fast motion etc. But, for a second telly, at this price, is that important? I'm sorely tempted to get it, and my local Aldi is selling Freeview HD boxes at £79. Don't think you could kit out a bedroom in full HD for much cheaper, and the quality would be acceptable I think.

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On a related note, I'm intending to buy a new telly, but a second one, just for a bedroom, so I don't want to buy a very expensive one, as I'm pretty happy with my main one. I saw at Tesco homestores yesterday, a 32in LG for around £250. It was full HD (1080p), and it had something called 24p full cinema mode, so it all seems good. The only thing I didn't see was 100HZ, which I think is quite important, for rendering of fast motion etc. But, for a second telly, at this price, is that important? I'm sorely tempted to get it, and my local Aldi is selling Freeview HD boxes at £79. Don't think you could kit out a bedroom in full HD for much cheaper, and the quality would be acceptable I think.

For me the important thing is the Freeview box or DVDRecorder/HardDrive/Sky+ machine has a twin tuner so i can record one programme which watching another. I can watch channels 1-5 in analogue still now being in London but 2012 is the turn-off sadly, as i have no problem with my analogue signal and having this and digital is ideal for me. I wasnt worried about 100HZ apart from my main TVs. Asda and Argos sometimes do cheap decent TVs too. :)

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On a related note, I'm intending to buy a new telly, but a second one, just for a bedroom, so I don't want to buy a very expensive one, as I'm pretty happy with my main one. I saw at Tesco homestores yesterday, a 32in LG for around £250. It was full HD (1080p), and it had something called 24p full cinema mode, so it all seems good. The only thing I didn't see was 100HZ, which I think is quite important, for rendering of fast motion etc. But, for a second telly, at this price, is that important? I'm sorely tempted to get it, and my local Aldi is selling Freeview HD boxes at £79. Don't think you could kit out a bedroom in full HD for much cheaper, and the quality would be acceptable I think.

One piece of advice others have given me is that you won't really notice much difference with full HD on a screen much less than 42", so you might be better off buying a better TV at a lower screen resolution. Having said that, £250 is a good price for a 32" by a fairly good manufacturer like LG.

I'm trying to find a second set but only a 26" and it seems you don't get such good value for money at the smaller screen sizes.

Any suggestions?

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One piece of advice others have given me is that you won't really notice much difference with full HD on a screen much less than 42", so you might be better off buying a better TV at a lower screen resolution. Having said that, £250 is a good price for a 32" by a fairly good manufacturer like LG.

I'm trying to find a second set but only a 26" and it seems you don't get such good value for money at the smaller screen sizes.

Any suggestions?

I was slightly inaccurate when I said £250, checking online now I see that it was £299.00. However, it includes a Freeview HD receiver, so it's better value than I originally thought, because I won't need to buy an external box just to get HD Freeview. It also has integrated Net viewing, although a quick scan of online reviews doesn't seem unanimously favourable as to how well this works. Finally, this very set is available on Amazon, for £269, NOT £299! I think I might be clicking my mouse a few times today! Just the worry of a bollocking from Mrs K for not discussing it with her that's stopping me at the moment!

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After reading all the advice and reviewing various TV's, I opted for an LG 42" LED tv. Have just set it up and am enjoying the various functions.

Thank you all for your advice.

The Medic.

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After reading all the advice and reviewing various TV's, I opted for an LG 42" LED tv. Have just set it up and am enjoying the various functions.

Thank you all for your advice.

The Medic.

Glad to hear your happy with it. :)

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