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ClimaxMan

Bbbj Risks

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Filming a tasty looking WG this weekend for pics for her website, no charges involved, but been promised a rather nice sloppy blowjob. Am I taking a risk or should I settle for a bloody good handjob instead?

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She's taking the risk, not you.

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For me OWO is an essential part of the punt, and in most cases if possible, so is RO. I normally shower before and after, but part of my regime is to clean/swab/wipe my penis with antibacterial gel, and if I've done RO, I normally wipe my toungue, gums and lips with it as well. Tastes bloody awful, but it doesn't last too long, and I normally swill some breath freshener afterwards, and in the case of my slightly burning genitals (because I wipe the anti bacterial gel under the foreskin and all around the head), I normally follow up quite quickly with a shower.

I think it's a helpful preventative measure, otherwise I wouldn't do it of course. Does anyone else do this?

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I think it's a helpful preventative measure, otherwise I wouldn't do it of course. Does anyone else do this?

I just had a bbbj and on the strength of reading your post, decided to wash my knob off with a bit of mouth wash. I feel very fresh. And tingly.

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I just had a bbbj and on the strength of reading your post, decided to wash my knob off with a bit of mouth wash. I feel very fresh. And tingly.

Mouthwash is for the mouth you eejit! :P:lol:

Edited by Kayak

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She's taking the risk, not you.

Why?

The risks of STDs are in both directions, surely?

Also, to another poster, antibacterial wash: will it kill viruses?

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antibacterial wash: will it kill viruses?

Ask the right question, get the right answers, so they say. That's a good question and worth a Google I thought. According to Canadian health authorities, anti bacterials are no more effective at killing viruses on hands than normal soap.

"The use of antibacterial soaps and detergents is no better at fighting germs than regular soap. It's actually the friction of washing with soap and water that removes germ microbes.

Rubbing the hands together breaks down the germ wall so that it washes down the drain. The type of soap used is less important...

The addition of an antibacterial agent, such as triclosan, to soap provides the added effect of killing organisms. But these products actually require prolonged contact to work — minutes, not seconds. This is why many antibacterials are useful in settings such as hospitals. At home, however, the average person doesn't wash his hands long enough for triclosan to have the desired effect.

Health Canada recently recommended avoiding products with triclosan because of concerns over antibacterial resistance. These cautions stem from the fact residue from chemicals, such as, triclosan can stay on hands and surfaces at low concentrations and could lead to antibiotic resistance.

Health Canada recommends proper hand washing with regular soap."

http://www.cbc.ca/marketplace/webextras/triclosan/antibacterial.html?triclosan

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Ask the right question, get the right answers, so they say. That's a good question and worth a Google I thought. According to Canadian health authorities, anti bacterials are no more effective at killing viruses on hands than normal soap.

"The use of antibacterial soaps and detergents is no better at fighting germs than regular soap. It's actually the friction of washing with soap and water that removes germ microbes.

Rubbing the hands together breaks down the germ wall so that it washes down the drain. The type of soap used is less important...

The addition of an antibacterial agent, such as triclosan, to soap provides the added effect of killing organisms. But these products actually require prolonged contact to work — minutes, not seconds. This is why many antibacterials are useful in settings such as hospitals. At home, however, the average person doesn't wash his hands long enough for triclosan to have the desired effect.

Health Canada recently recommended avoiding products with triclosan because of concerns over antibacterial resistance. These cautions stem from the fact residue from chemicals, such as, triclosan can stay on hands and surfaces at low concentrations and could lead to antibiotic resistance.

Health Canada recommends proper hand washing with regular soap."

http://www.cbc.ca/marketplace/webextras/triclosan/antibacterial.html?triclosan

Depends just what question is asked. I agree that triclosan in soap would have no effect, as triclosan needs time to be effective and you aren't going to immerse your hands (or anything else) in the stuff for a couple of hours. On the other hand, an alcohol-based gel or alcohol-containing wipe will reduce the population of bacteria on the skin as, e.g. will iodine solution or Dettol or TCP, since these work rapidly by coagulating proteins. They will kill viruses too. The catch, however, is that none of these will kill the whole population of bacteria or viruses, least of all any in an ulcer or in the urethra (which they won't reach). In other words, they may reduce the probability of transmission, but can't provide a guarantee...... and this is the point, biology is all probabilities, not the absolutes of physics.

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