JKay

Windows 7 Ultimate

10 posts in this topic

Stupid question, but how to I tell if this is running 32 or 64 bit?

Thanks.

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Wow that's convoluted

If you have the Computer icon on the Desktop, right click on it and click properties

If there is no Desktop icon, click on the start button and then right click on the computer option an dlick properties

A window should open, under System there is an entry for System Type, if it doesn't sat 64-bit then it isn't.

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Wow that's convoluted

If you have the Computer icon on the Desktop, right click on it and click properties

If there is no Desktop icon, click on the start button and then right click on the computer option an dlick properties

A window should open, under System there is an entry for System Type, if it doesn't sat 64-bit then it isn't.

open a command prompt

start | run | cmd

type set | find (x86)

if you get

ProgramFiles(x86)=C:\Program Files (x86)

then you're probably on 64bit, as it's created the 32bit compatibility directory.

or to identidfy procesor

type set | find "64"

result

CommonProgramW6432=C:\Program Files\Common Files

PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE=AMD64

PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER=Intel64 Family 6 Model 23 Stepping 6, GenuineIntel

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A related question :

I've just upgraded to Windows 7 ultimate on a new dual core machine capable of 64bit operation. During the install process I never saw anything where I had to make a choice between installing the 32 or the 64bit operating system and when finished it seems I have the 32bit o/s installed.

Did I miss something obvious ?

Also on a machine that is fairly fast so start with am I going to see any dramatic improvement by actually having the 64bit system installed ?

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A related question :

I've just upgraded to Windows 7 ultimate on a new dual core machine capable of 64bit operation. During the install process I never saw anything where I had to make a choice between installing the 32 or the 64bit operating system and when finished it seems I have the 32bit o/s installed.

Did I miss something obvious ?

Did you perform an upgrade or a fresh install? I would imagine that if you were upgrading it would not allow you to switch from 32-bit to 64-bit.

Also on a machine that is fairly fast so start with am I going to see any dramatic improvement by actually having the 64bit system installed ?

No, in practice the only tangible benefit of 64-bit on a consumer system is having access to more than 4 GB of RAM. In fact having 64-bit can reduce the performance of the system, however this is usually negligible.

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Did you perform an upgrade or a fresh install? I would imagine that if you were upgrading it would not allow you to switch from 32-bit to 64-bit.

Thanks for that - is was, I thought, a fresh install - but that said I had been running XP-Pro previously so perhaps I should have done a format first. I was perhaps of the mistaken opinion that Win 7 would automatically do a format first.

No, in practice the only tangible benefit of 64-bit on a consumer system is having access to more than 4 GB of RAM. In fact having 64-bit can reduce the performance of the system, however this is usually negligible.

That figures. I've got 4GB memory and it works fine. Also when I look at the performance tab in Task Manager both cores of the processor seem to be working equally. I'll leave it as it is until the next time I've got to re-install.

Thanks your input.

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I've just upgraded to Windows 7 ultimate on a new dual core machine capable of 64bit operation. During the install process I never saw anything where I had to make a choice between installing the 32 or the 64bit operating system and when finished it seems I have the 32bit o/s installed.

Did I miss something obvious ?

Also on a machine that is fairly fast so start with am I going to see any dramatic improvement by actually having the 64bit system installed ?

There are two separate CD's, one for the 64bit install the other for 32bit.

If you have 4GB of memory on the system then you will get around 3.2GB usable on the system. If your bios supports it (many new ones do) you can have a look on the bios for an option offering an extended memory addressing feature (or words to that effect as it changes to whatever board manufactures wants to call it) and get the full 4GB memory accessible on the 32bit system.

Another way around it is you can install a Ram disk, as many ram disk software allow you to use as the ram disk that memory that is untouched in the 32bit OS. Your onboard system ram is way faster than even the fastest SSD so you will get blazing speeds from a ram disk.

In fact having 64-bit can reduce the performance of the system, however this is usually negligible.

Where did you see this or what basis are you suggesting that? I am a new member so don't like to disagree but I would say this is totally wrong.

The only time you may see a hit on performance is if the program you are running is not properly coded and thus has issues on 64bit OS's but as 64bit CPU's have been around since 2006 that is very rare.

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Another way around it is you can install a Ram disk, as many ram disk software allow you to use as the ram disk that memory that is untouched in the 32bit OS. Your onboard system ram is way faster than even the fastest SSD so you will get blazing speeds from a ram disk.

Can you explain "Ram disk" and how set it up, sounds a good idea, thanks.

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Can you explain "Ram disk" and how set it up, sounds a good idea, thanks.

A Ram disk is using a part of your onboard system Ram as a hard drive on your system.

There are numerous benefits for that, one like I say is onboard DRam is blazing fast. The access times are infinitesimal so you can have an incredibly fast hard drive on your system.

Onboard memory also volatile, so this means when the ram loses power it is cleared, this means you can use it as a temp drive on your system for browsing the internet and it would be safe fast and secure.

What you can do is download Sandboxie (a sandbox application for running applications and your browser secure inside a sandbox) then put the sandbox running from the ramdisk so you can have superfast speeds and also totally secure system.

But anyway the ramdisk software I use is the one from Dataram. It used to be free but now its free if you want to use a ramdisk less than 4GB over that its $10.

Here is a link to it

Dataram Ramdisk

But here is also a list of the 12 main ram disk softwares and benchmarks you get from them if you wanted to try another.

12 RAM Disk Software Benchmarked for Fastest Read and Write Speed

Like I say another feature many of them offer is allowing you to access the inaccessible portion of the memory if you have over 3.2GB in a 32bit system and use this as the ram disk.

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