pinkshirt

Profession?

8 posts in this topic

I was reading replies to the guy who wanted to date a WG and several comments along the lines of "I don't understand why you'd specifically want to date a WG or any professional for that matter" got me thinking is prostitution really a profession.

This shouldnt IMHO be a devisive topic but understanding that it may be construed as such let me first caveat this by stressing I'm putting this question out there purely from a semantic perspective. I don't attach any special value to the term profession or professional and am not therefore implying that anyone or any career is any more or less worthy because it is classified as a profession. I apologise if you read any more into this than is intended and take offence.

The reason I queried the use of professional was I associate the term with belonging to a professional body which requires it's members to stick to certain rules/values in both their professional and private lives or risk loss of membership. That is why for a first driving license the photo must be signed by a person that knows the applicant for certain period and is a judge/policeman/politician/member of profession (because the stakes of lying are theoretically higher for those individuals).

Then looking further one dictionary defines profession as

"- noun 1. occupation requiring advanced education 2. the persons engaged in such an occupation 3. declaration"

Whilst some people here say they have a pretence for a highly educated WG, it's not a requirement of being a WG.

I prefer Wikipedia's definition but it doesn't seem to help either

"A profession is a vocation founded upon specialized educational training, the purpose of which is to supply disinterested counsel and service to others, for a direct and definite compensation, wholly apart from expectation of other business gain."

Again it seems to fall down on specialised educational training.

The only arguments I see in favour are common useage with phrases such as "the oldest profession" and from a comparison to sport where the distinction between amateur and professional is over whether you're paid for participating or not.

What does everyone else think, is prostitution a profession or would another word such as vocation be more technically correct?

And maybe more interesting question, do you think it could ever tick all of the boxes of a profession? Would certainly help both sides having clearly defined terms of service/method of appeal/professional body providing support/insurance/training etc....

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It's no more a profession than any job that requires no training.

To imply otherwise is to patronise those who do have to train for their professions.

It doesn't deny the fact that the job can be difficult as well as rewarding...................but then that can apply to many jobs.

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i tjink many people see professional as the opposite of amateur, as in professional and amateur sport.

maybe that is where calling WG's professionals comes from

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i tjink many people see professional as the opposite of amateur, as in professional and amateur sport.

maybe that is where calling WG's professionals comes from

I got called a 'filthy pro' as soon as I started selling stories for money. "If you take money for it, you're a pro," they said.

Which isn't like a golf or tennis pro but still.

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Rather than looking at definitions of 'profession' surely there should be some working out of how the money to pay the first WG was earnt?

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What does everyone else think, is prostitution a profession or would another word such as vocation be more technically correct?

Prostitution is not a profession and is not internationally recognised as a profession. It is often referred to as “the oldest profession” to illustrate the organised aspect of it.

And maybe more interesting question, do you think it could ever tick all of the boxes of a profession? Would certainly help both sides having clearly defined terms of service/method of appeal/professional body providing support/insurance/training etc....

this would certainly help both sides

Edited by reeve11

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The 'oldest profession' tag has always been a joke expression with no serious claim of accuracy in its use of the term.

A vocation is an occupation engaged in by people who (at least in theory) pursue a higher public benefit going beyond the financial rewards of the work. E.g. justice, relief of suffering, dissemination of knowledge. Prostitution probably does have public benefits, as therapy or entertainment, but it's not a vocation, because the motive for pursuing it is primarily or exclusively financial. (Unfortunately the same is often said of the legal profession).

A profession is a vocation that self-regulates so as to protect its higher public benefit from the intrusion of unqualified or unscrupulous persons. Prostitution isn't a profession, because there isn't (and perhaps sadly never will be) a General Whoring Council that can certify the credentials of a WG or strike her off if it finds her guilty of misconduct.

Prostitution is a trade, within the personal-services sector of the economy. Not too different from hairdressing. People who engage in such trades are by definition professionals as distinct from amateurs, because their talents are for hire. They may - or may not - also show qualities that are called professional, such as pride in their work, or setting themselves high standards of service.

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I like Chris's answer !

However as an aside to that, one can also be called a 'professional', within some particular field, when one utilises that endeavour as a sole or main source of income, e.g. professional vs amateur musician, writer, artist or even gambler.

So if that definition of 'professional' is justified, and in my opinion it is as it is in general accepted usage within the lexicon, then wgs can be called 'professionals' when the activity generates their sole or main source of income.

Its irrelevant whether or not they're any good at the job as the abundance of lousy, but still 'professional' and in some cases high earning, musicians, writers and artists lay testament.

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