Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
pvcman

Calibrating Hd Tvs

8 posts in this topic

I bought a fairly good HD TV last year but despite altering some of the settings, I couldn't get the picture to look as I wanted it to, especially compared to how it looked in the shop. The trouble is there are so many available settings that can be changed so how do you know which ones to change and by how much?

I've read that you can calibrate your TV - has anyone done it themselves and what method did you use? Did it work well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are guides on the avforum website but you will need a reference DVD. I tried with my Panny and the standard settings were pretty much spot on, so it's hardly worth doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AS its me and I rarely stay on subject...

Our old CRT 28 inch Sony, now replaced with a 40 inch LCD Sony, had all manner of service menus.

One of which was 'Time run count' or similar. Another was 'Degrade picture' or similar.

So, with modern TVs, or any receiving/transmitting devices, I expect there is the possibility of 'adjusting' one's TV to do whatever the manufacturers wish.

Call me cynical if you wish.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've read that you can calibrate your TV - has anyone done it themselves and what method did you use? Did it work well?

You can pay to have your TV calibrated but it very much depends on the make and model, and it's something I eventually intend to have done to my Panasonic plasma although the results out of the box are allegedly very good.

It's worth checking to see if the TV has been reviewed at www.hdtvtest.co.uk and see what they reckon about the standard calibration. Note that you don't want to have the set calibrated as it is in the shop (brightness, contrast, colour saturation/profile are set far too high to give literally visual impact), but some sets prolly aren't worth paying to have calibrated (I doubt I'd have a LCD set calibrated as the colour reproduction etc is never going to match the best plasma sets, at least until backlighting is sorted, and despite the marketing hype LED backlighting isn't a panacea).

One way of calibrating yourself is to use a THX certified DVD which will have a calibration option somewhere or to source and download a calibration DVD off the internet.

B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can pay to have your TV calibrated but it very much depends on the make and model, and it's something I eventually intend to have done to my Panasonic plasma although the results out of the box are allegedly very good.

It's worth checking to see if the TV has been reviewed at www.hdtvtest.co.uk and see what they reckon about the standard calibration. Note that you don't want to have the set calibrated as it is in the shop (brightness, contrast, colour saturation/profile are set far too high to give literally visual impact), but some sets prolly aren't worth paying to have calibrated (I doubt I'd have a LCD set calibrated as the colour reproduction etc is never going to match the best plasma sets, at least until backlighting is sorted, and despite the marketing hype LED backlighting isn't a panacea).

One way of calibrating yourself is to use a THX certified DVD which will have a calibration option somewhere or to source and download a calibration DVD off the internet.

B

I wanted to do it myself as I don't think the TV is expensive enough to justify getting it professionally done.

I'd heard about using a THX certified DVD with a calibration option so I think I will check that out. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having looked into this, I have to say that this is just bollocks, sorry.

All these companies are doing is asking you to to stump up a further £200 just to adjust the contrast, colour and other user parameters of your TV.

In the HiFi world (and I have a system that would cost you today around £20k), this is called 'snake oil'. The more the snake oil costs, the more the perceived benefits, assuming you have lots of money.

You can adjust all these parameters yourself, they are designed to be that way.

A far clearer picture would be realised by finding a way of cleaning the screen and allowing it to do what it was supposed to do in the first place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having looked into this, I have to say that this is just bollocks, sorry.

All these companies are doing is asking you to to stump up a further £200 just to adjust the contrast, colour and other user parameters of your TV.

In the HiFi world (and I have a system that would cost you today around £20k), this is called 'snake oil'. The more the snake oil costs, the more the perceived benefits, assuming you have lots of money.

You can adjust all these parameters yourself, they are designed to be that way.

A far clearer picture would be realised by finding a way of cleaning the screen and allowing it to do what it was supposed to do in the first place.

Err, no it isn't actually, or at least isn't if you have a set which has ISFccc calibration like my Panny plasma does. :rolleyes:

(Although having said that, it is pretty much accurate out of the box - allegedly, anyway - and I assume any benefit would be gained by taking into account the effect of ambient light at the time of calibration.)

B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My LCD tv (and I imagine most others have it) has a built in thing where it shows you a series of pictures of different types/colours/shapes/etc and you adjust it for which you prefer.

While I doubt this is as accurate as one of these paid-for tune services, it looks good to me...which I guess is the point.

Oh and you might want to consider that your eyes aren't right. When I bought it, I was moving from a CRT TV. I spent ages trying to make it look like my old TV, and even plugged them both in side-by-side showing the same thing, to try and match the picture. At this point, I realised my old TV (my perceived "good") was wrong. The colour on the old TV was so far wrong it couldn't be corrected. People looked quite orange. But it had happened so gradually, I'd got used to it. A few months on, my new picture is very good, I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0