Jimmy Bond

Personal Details Listed On A Networking Site - How To Remove It?

9 posts in this topic

I like to keep my online presence anonymous - so i like to prevent any information about myself appearing online.

So I googled myself out of boredom, and found that there was a listing for me on one of these 'network' sites for professionals, listing a couple of details of my old firm.

Most of these details were woefully incorrect as my previous firm was a large multinational with offices all over the place - however the firm name itself they got correct.

Now I'd rather not have this info online - not because of any issue I have with my old firm, but just because its no one else's goddamn business where I work/(ed), unless I want them to know.

I won't name the site itself here, but it's one of the sites that cull personal info and then list them, claiming that the people are part of its netwrok, and if you join, you can see their details.

As to how they got my details in the first place - I can only assume an ex-employee sold the personal details of everyone at the firm to a 3rd party, and its now ended up here.

My question is how can I go about removing this information? Is their webmaster likely to comply if I ask them? Moreover, is it legal for them to list my personal information on their website without my permission?

Any advice appreciated.

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My question is how can I go about removing this information? Is their webmaster likely to comply if I ask them? Moreover, is it legal for them to list my personal information on their website without my permission?

Any advice appreciated.

If it is a UK or EU company you demand removal referencing Data Protection Act or EU Data Protection Directive. A lot of US companies actual have regional head offices in the EU and therefore these also have to comply with EU law.

This give you the right to remove or correct personal information, if you point out the Data is incorrect but do not provide the correct data they have no option but to remove it.

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Thanks for the advice.

They're a US company, but I didn't see any details for a European regional office. Anyway I emailed them asking them to remove it, so I'll see what they say.

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Being Googled under my real name and having people find out information about me that may be irrelevant or could be used against me is why I dont to Facebook, LinkedIn or anything like. I even use a second email account for all mail order that asks for email address - also reduces loads of spam too.

There's a lot of entries for Taggart, mind you!

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Ok, so I sent them an email request that my information be removed, and they haven't bothered to even reply (except an automated confirmation email that my email has been recieved).

What's my next step? They are a US based company, and I don't think they have European regional offices.

Who can I complain to? I don't want to have to do something drastic like take legal action unless absolutely necessary - but is that avenue even open to me? I really hate having some piece of shit company publicise personal information without my consent and against my will.

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send em a correction that is made up rubbish

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Ok, so I sent them an email request that my information be removed, and they haven't bothered to even reply (except an automated confirmation email that my email has been recieved).

What's my next step? They are a US based company, and I don't think they have European regional offices.

Who can I complain to? I don't want to have to do something drastic like take legal action unless absolutely necessary - but is that avenue even open to me? I really hate having some piece of shit company publicise personal information without my consent and against my will.

If in your shoes, I would consider exploring the following option, though I don't know how great the chances of success might be.

If this info relates to your (past) employment in the UK, and the data was originally recorded in the UK whilst you were an employee, then I would have thought that there was a reasonable case for a complaint to the UK Data Protection registrar. You could make a case (imo) that 1) you did not consent for this information to be placed in the public domain, and 2) that the data is not all accurate. Potentially you might be able to add that the inaccurate information for example prejudices your future employment prospects etc.

By involving the Data Protection registrar it may lend more weight to your complaint with the site. Hopefully.

Good luck.

Edited by TheVicar

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If this info relates to your (past) employment in the UK, and the data was originally recorded in the UK whilst you were an employee, then I would have thought that there was a reasonable case for a complaint to the UK Data Protection registrar. You could make a case (imo) that 1) you did not consent for this information to be placed in the public domain, and 2) that the data is not all accurate. Potentially you might be able to add that the inaccurate information for example prejudices your future employment prospects etc.

By involving the Data Protection registrar it may lend more weight to your complaint with the site. Hopefully.

Good luck.

In this case there is no case for a complaint to the Data Commissioner simply because once the data is published as it appears to have been then the data protection rules no longer apply.

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The Data Protection Act lays down certain rules for the protection and benefit of everyone.

These (principles) specify that personal data must be:

1. Processed fairly and lawfully.

2. Obtained for specified and lawful purposes.

3. Adequate, relevant and not excessive.

4. Accurate and up to date.

5. Not kept any longer than necessary.

6. Processed in accordance with the “data subject’s” (the individual’s) rights.

7. Securely kept.

8. Not transferred to any other country without adequate protection in situ.

If I understand the OP correctly, he has cause for concern on principles 4 and 5, and a complaint may be warranted.

It also raises serious question about personal posting on not only social networking sites but on these 'professional' sites, particularly if the person concerned has provded them. I decided long ago that Facebook or Linkedin were not for me and dont regret it at all.

I recently had cause to complain to a Government department about data being held about my father who died 15 years ago, and they tried to justify why it was being kept, but I found out from the Information Commissioner, that the DP Act does not apply to the deceased !

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