Coventrypunter

Punting Etymology

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For most of my life a punter was someone who betted. People talked of mug punters, people who placed bets without any knowledge of form so the word was generally used, even on TV.

People also referred to customers as punters,

Then I discovered this lark and the word took on a whole new meaning.

When did the work start to be used for seeing wg's and did it originally mean one was taking some sort of risk or gamble by doing it?

There again it may have come from the other use of the use of punting, i.e those silly boats they use at Oxbridge. But not so silly because they were originally a duck hunting boat, so mebbe was something to do with hunting wg's. But probably not.

Anyone old enough to remember when 'punting' was not used for our hobby?

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For most of my life a punter was someone who betted. People talked of mug punters, people who placed bets without any knowledge of form so the word was generally used, even on TV.

People also referred to customers as punters,

Then I discovered this lark and the word took on a whole new meaning.

When did the work start to be used for seeing wg's and did it originally mean one was taking some sort of risk or gamble by doing it?

There again it may have come from the other use of the use of punting, i.e those silly boats they use at Oxbridge. But not so silly because they were originally a duck hunting boat, so mebbe was something to do with hunting wg's. But probably not.

Anyone old enough to remember when 'punting' was not used for our hobby?

Aah punting.. you slide your pole into the squelchy dampness below...your long sleek vessel is soon making it's way up the narrow wet channel...your muscles tense as you thrust your rod in hard and deep into the ooze and you soon get a nice steady rhythm going...

Great fun messing about on the river, isn't it!?! :D

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Aah punting.. you slide your pole into the squelchy dampness below...your long sleek vessel is soon making it's way up the narrow wet channel...your muscles tense as you thrust your rod in hard and deep into the ooze and you soon get a nice steady rhythm going...

Great fun messing about on the river, isn't it!?! :D

Love it.

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Aah punting.. you slide your pole into the squelchy dampness below...your long sleek vessel is soon making it's way up the narrow wet channel...your muscles tense as you thrust your rod in hard and deep into the ooze and you soon get a nice steady rhythm going...

Great fun messing about on the river, isn't it!?! :D

old joke

whats the difference between Watneys red barrel and sex in a punt?

None -both fucking close to water!

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old joke

whats the difference between Watneys red barrel and sex in a punt?

None -both fucking close to water!

You'll have to explain what Watneys Red Barrel is, Cov, to our younger viewers

Unless they know the Travel Agent sketch, of course........

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You'll have to explain what Watneys Red Barrel is, Cov, to our younger viewers

Unless they know the Travel Agent sketch, of course........

Watneys red barrel was a nasty weak keg beer in the early 1980's

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Watneys red barrel was a nasty weak keg beer in the early 1980's

Earlier than that, 70's I reckon. You could get a party seven of the stuff for your teen parties. Monty Python mocked it mercilessly

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snapback.pngCoventrypunter, on 13 July 2012 - 16:15, said:

Watneys red barrel was a nasty weak keg beer in the early 1980's

Earlier than that, 70's I reckon. You could get a party seven of the stuff for your teen parties. Monty Python mocked it mercilessly

Don't take the piss out of Watney's. It spoils the flavour....

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Earlier than that, 70's I reckon. You could get a party seven of the stuff for your teen parties. Monty Python mocked it mercilessly

It was around in the 60s even, and although rubbish compared to today's 'real ale' was very popular because real ales in those days were often bloody awful & Red Barrel was at least consistent in the same way McDonalds is now.

It wasn't particularly weak either (nobody published alcohol content then), but Watneys starlight was very weak, tasteless and generally dreadful.

It's main competitor was 'Whitbread Tankard'. which I'm sure would taste terrible if they still made it now.

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It was around in the 60s even, and although rubbish compared to today's 'real ale' was very popular because real ales in those days were often bloody awful & Red Barrel was at least consistent in the same way McDonalds is now.

It wasn't particularly weak either (nobody published alcohol content then), but Watneys starlight was very weak, tasteless and generally dreadful.

It's main competitor was 'Whitbread Tankard'. which I'm sure would taste terrible if they still made it now.

generally referred to as tithead wankered

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generally referred to as tithead wankered

I must admit, i thought it was good at the time, but???

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I must admit, i thought it was good at the time, but???

I was a camra nut at the time so DD, tankard and red barrel were all considered the urine of satan

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Back to OP...not sure origin of term Punter but all insular groups tend to have their own jargon, often using benign frequently used terms to disguise the real intent..so that if a 'civilian' inadvertently overheard a conversation etc there was an intentional degree of ambiguity that could be used for 'plausible deniability'- maybe you were talking about betting etc....

FWIW- Here in N.America, people in this game tend to call ourselves either 'monger' & 'hobbyist' ( the latter I find a bit silly as imo, it conjures up images of stamp-collectors etc).

But Monger is a great term- gather one of earliest widespread use of the phrase as an insult is in Hamlet, when he calls Polonius a fishmonger in a tirade of insults.Some scholars believe he is using it as a euphemism for "pimp" (because he was pushing for his daughter Ophelia to wed Hamlet for political gain), though there is no recorded evidence that this was done during this time or before, so either they're wrong or Shakespeare invented that insult.

Fishmongering was considered a lowly profession, presumably for the smell. However, Hamlet also tells Polonius he wishes he were as honest as a fishmonger, insulting him further.

Obviously the term "whoremonger" is an insult, just as "whore" is. Oddly enough, "fishmonger" means someone who sells fish, while "whoremonger" means someone who patronizes prostitutes (I mean, you'd think "whoremonger" would mean pimp that way the suffix is used in every other context but in fact it means the opposite).

But when we use "monger" I take it to mean a self-deprecating bit of fun.

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Ah words, words, words, the beauties. Can't find it, don't have a fat OED lying to hand. When someone finds this use of punter can they find the origin of munter? I love it but don't use it. Tis charmingly abusive.

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First use of punter around 1700

First use in sense of client for WGs circa 1970, Sunday Times article march ´70

There are 5 uses as you mentioned OP

First use of munter around 1993 according to Green slang dictionary

 

you´re welcome ;)

Edited by Bonkersenseless

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Bollocks to the original question - the history of Watneys Red Barrel is far more interesting!!!

So famous was Watneys that it actually sponsored a football tournament in the 1970's. The Watney Cup started in 1970 and lasted for 4 seasons. It was an invitational tournamnet played at teh start of the season and competed for by the 8 highest scorers in all the football league. The first winners were Manchester United.

If only Watneys had put this money into producing a product which did not as Coventrypunter rightly points out tasted like the devils urine. It was always the case that the last alcohol left at any party was a Party 7 of Watneys (one big round tin of awfulness). In all truth my friends and i had one of these for over three years and it went to every party we did and always left with us untouched. I became quite attached to the tin itself as it witnessed many of the best nights of my mid teens.

Edited by bigjohn9

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Bollocks to the original question - the history of Watneys Red Barrel is far more interesting!!!

So famous was Watneys that it actually sponsored a football tournament in the 1970's. The Watney Cup started in 1970 and lasted for 4 seasons. It was an invitational tournamnet played at teh start of the season and competed for by the 8 highest scorers in all the football league. The first winners were Manchester United.

If only Watneys had put this money into producing a product which did not as Coventrypunter rightly points out tasted like the devils urine. It was always the case that the last alcohol left at any party was a Party 7 of Watneys (one big round tin of awfulness). In all truth my friends and i had one of these for over three years and it went to every party we did and always left with us untouched. I became quite attached to the tin itself as it witnessed many of the best nights of my mid teens.

and now their mortlake brewery makes budweiser - still making gnats pee.

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"Escort" to me sounds so much nicer than "prostitute" these days. If only someone would come up with a less derogatory term for "punter". Only my own personal opinion of course.

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For most of my life a punter was someone who betted. People talked of mug punters, people who placed bets without any knowledge of form so the word was generally used, even on TV.

People also referred to customers as punters,

Then I discovered this lark and the word took on a whole new meaning.

When did the work start to be used for seeing wg's and did it originally mean one was taking some sort of risk or gamble by doing it?

There again it may have come from the other use of the use of punting, i.e those silly boats they use at Oxbridge. But not so silly because they were originally a duck hunting boat, so mebbe was something to do with hunting wg's. But probably not.

Anyone old enough to remember when 'punting' was not used for our hobby?

 

I didnt hear the word punter until i met other punters many years after i started punting. I was called a John by most WGs and in my area that was the usual term used in my experience.

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For most of my life a punter was someone who betted. People talked of mug punters, people who placed bets without any knowledge of form so the word was generally used, even on TV.

People also referred to customers as punters,

Then I discovered this lark and the word took on a whole new meaning.

When did the work start to be used for seeing wg's and did it originally mean one was taking some sort of risk or gamble by doing it?

There again it may have come from the other use of the use of punting, i.e those silly boats they use at Oxbridge. But not so silly because they were originally a duck hunting boat, so mebbe was something to do with hunting wg's. But probably not.

Anyone old enough to remember when 'punting' was not used for our hobby?

Taking a punt.  Some men who see regular ladies say they are not punters because they are not taking a punt now x

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