wanderlust

Phthallates In Sex Toys

4 posts in this topic

Phthallates are chemicals used in plastics, including for some vibrators and dildos, as softeners. They may leach out. If so, they are not really sort of things you want circulating in your body, being toxic. See e.g.

http://health.yahoo.net/articles/sexual-health/sex-toys-and-phthalates-risky-or-not

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19333870/ns/health-sexual_health/t/when-sex-toys-turn-green-health/

There is no claim that I can find that any individual has been harmed by phthallates from a sex toy.... and it may just be another overblown health scare. Nevertheless, a neurosis that catches on has as much effect on human behaviour as an epidemic (see GM foods, for example), which brings me to the point that a start-up company (lovebuni.com on seedrs.com) is pitching its case on its toys being phthallate-free. It will also ensure that they are ethically sourced and will have a recycling scheme.

So to the question: Is anyone actually worried about phthallates in sex toys? Or whether they are made in sweatshops, for that matter?

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Surely most WGs use a condom with vibrators though? It's much more hygenic and also solves this problem as well.

Moral of the story - no vibrator BB ;)

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Fair comment, Ray. However:

1) I assume that some forum members use sex toys in a non-professional capacity

and

2) Latex membranes have small pores, they are not a brick wall. They are a barrier to bacteria and (just and so---- see e.g. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1411838) to viruses such as HIV, but perhaps not to small molecules such as phthallates.

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Fair comment, Ray. However:

1) I assume that some forum members use sex toys in a non-professional capacity

and

2) Latex membranes have small pores, they are not a brick wall. They are a barrier to bacteria and (just and so---- see e.g. http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/1411838) to viruses such as HIV, but perhaps not to small molecules such as phthallates.

I thought phthallates were pretty much unavoidable anyway.

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