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Strawberry

Article Re Trafficking, And Failure To Tackle Effectively

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A very good article in yesterday's Guardian on a report by the Centre for Social Justice on the failure to effectively tackle trafficking, and deal with the victims. This article quite rightly identifies not only the sex industry, because a large number of people are also forced into slave labour in other industries too.

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/law/2013/mar/09/shameful-failure-slavery-trafficking-uk

 

I've also just heard an excerpt from an interview with a trafficked guy as part of a news bulletin, referring to this report on Radio 6, he speaks of people being abused for not working long or hard enough on 18 hour shifts.

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Thank you for the heads up Strawberry.

With the Centre for Social Justice being a conservative think-tank, you'd expect them perhaps to be soft on the failings of the UKBA and the 6 or so other agencies that are there to prevent & prosecute trafficking, but they seem harsh. I like their use of the term 'modern slavery'.

 

The full report 'It Happens Here', all 220+ pages of it should be published after Monday, so it might be worth scanning for testimony from this industry.

 

The sentence in the CSJ history 'Our consistent hope has been that each person, family and community is given every possible opportunity to reach their full potential' made me :cool: , - all it needs is the addition of the words 'One Nation', and it could have been said by the Leader of the Opposition.

 

The report, It Happens Here, will be published on Monday.

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The sentence in the CSJ history 'Our consistent hope has been that each person, family and community is given every possible opportunity to reach their full potential' made me :cool: , - all it needs is the addition of the words 'One Nation', and it could have been said by the Leader of the Opposition.

 

The report, It Happens Here, will be published on Monday.

Oh, I dunno - IDS is a classic leftie Guardsman (and all the better for it) although I think that he lacks the "ruthless, extrovert, shit" labels necessary for Prime Minister.

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The full report is here:

The bongo recommendation is not to read it as it's horrible - not the conclusions and not for drawing more attention to the issue, but because it's just far too big ( 224 pages ) and tortured in trying to tackle too many subjects using no data of their own, just interviews ( 180 of them ) to arrive at their recommendations ( 80 of them ).

 

Here's my best effort at a review, if there's a mistake, please make allowances, as it is awfully long:

Likes-

1) There is no recommendation to change UK laws relating to prostitution. Considering this line 'Modern slavery has been allowed to grow and develop in the UK because of demand ' occurred early in the report, I was a little worried that a view would be taken on dealing with the demand for consensual paid sex, but there was none.

2) The term 'modern slavery' is spot on. It captures a broad range of cases including domestic slaves, sexual slaves, work-place slaves, child slaves etc and they don't have to have been trafficked across an international border. The comparisons to slavery in Wilberforce's time seem well made.

3) They use the Palermo definition of trafficking, where there has to be coercion of some kind ( modified for children who can't be expected to dissent ). They don't use a stupid definition of trafficking which involves willing migrants.

 

Dislikes-

1) It contains a massive advert for a for-profit company Manpower, who presumably have put up some funding for the CSJ.

2) There's a massive piece of suspected bull-shit which isn't analysed, just published without question. This is the example of Hannah who over one weekend was raped by 90 men. A gentleman called Mike Hand, described as former Tactical Adviser on child trafficking cases at the UK Human Trafficking Centre. That's such a major story, corroboration is needed, and there is none. Not in the report, not on google. The logistics of arranging that crime, with that number of criminals is astonishing, none of whom are decent enough to know that they're doing wrong. If it's one of the cases that's due in court later this year of child grooming for sex exploitation in a certain northern city, then they should wait until after the trial before reporting it.

( please note, I'm convinced there are real victims like Hannah who have been raped by a small gang of collaborators, after being befriended. And cannot imagine what it was like for her. I'm just not buying the figure of 90, and am criticising the report not her ).

3) Poor quality data.

They go from saying that modern slavery is growing to saying: 'This review is not about quantifying the scale of modern slavery in the UK; an exact number
will never be possible given the hidden nature of the crime.'

So how do they know it's growing? is the obvious question.

They quote the figures from SOCA web-site and add 'The figures used . . .reflect the small number of cases known about, but are a pale reflection of the true size of the problem .'

So how do they know that the SOCA figures are a pale reflection of the problem, when the SOCA figures show that only around 30% of cases referred to them are established as trafficking by the time the statistics are published ( although it seems around half of the rest could be as they haven't got round to or are unable to verify them ).

 

For info: the National Referral Mechanism has been operating from 01.04.09 in its current form, and it's common when any new method of collecting data is established, and inviting reports of cases of trafficking, for the numbers to grow in the early years. This doesn't validate the claim that modern slavery is growing though, it might well be, but it's not definite - the SOCA numbers seem to be running at just over 300 cases per 3 month period in 2012.

It's interesting that Nigeria is always the top ranked country of origin for victims too.

 

I think the CSJ should perhaps have gone for one aspect - child slavery is a subject worth a big report on its own, and obtained some original data, along with the witness evidence.



 

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The full report is here:

The bongo recommendation is not to read it as it's horrible - not the conclusions and not for drawing more attention to the issue, but because it's just far too big ( 224 pages ) and tortured in trying to tackle too many subjects using no data of their own, just interviews ( 180 of them ) to arrive at their recommendations ( 80 of them ).

 

Here's my best effort at a review, if there's a mistake, please make allowances, as it is awfully long:

Likes-

1) There is no recommendation to change UK laws relating to prostitution. Considering this line 'Modern slavery has been allowed to grow and develop in the UK because of demand ' occurred early in the report, I was a little worried that a view would be taken on dealing with the demand for consensual paid sex, but there was none.

2) The term 'modern slavery' is spot on. It captures a broad range of cases including domestic slaves, sexual slaves, work-place slaves, child slaves etc and they don't have to have been trafficked across an international border. The comparisons to slavery in Wilberforce's time seem well made.

3) They use the Palermo definition of trafficking, where there has to be coercion of some kind ( modified for children who can't be expected to dissent ). They don't use a stupid definition of trafficking which involves willing migrants.

 

Dislikes-

1) It contains a massive advert for a for-profit company Manpower, who presumably have put up some funding for the CSJ.

2) There's a massive piece of suspected bull-shit which isn't analysed, just published without question. This is the example of Hannah who over one weekend was raped by 90 men. A gentleman called Mike Hand, described as former Tactical Adviser on child trafficking cases at the UK Human Trafficking Centre. That's such a major story, corroboration is needed, and there is none. Not in the report, not on google. The logistics of arranging that crime, with that number of criminals is astonishing, none of whom are decent enough to know that they're doing wrong. If it's one of the cases that's due in court later this year of child grooming for sex exploitation in a certain northern city, then they should wait until after the trial before reporting it.

( please note, I'm convinced there are real victims like Hannah who have been raped by a small gang of collaborators, after being befriended. And cannot imagine what it was like for her. I'm just not buying the figure of 90, and am criticising the report not her ).

3) Poor quality data.

They go from saying that modern slavery is growing to saying: 'This review is not about quantifying the scale of modern slavery in the UK; an exact number

will never be possible given the hidden nature of the crime.'

So how do they know it's growing? is the obvious question.

They quote the figures from SOCA web-site and add 'The figures used . . .reflect the small number of cases known about, but are a pale reflection of the true size of the problem .'

So how do they know that the SOCA figures are a pale reflection of the problem, when the SOCA figures show that only around 30% of cases referred to them are established as trafficking by the time the statistics are published ( although it seems around half of the rest could be as they haven't got round to or are unable to verify them ).

 

For info: the National Referral Mechanism has been operating from 01.04.09 in its current form, and it's common when any new method of collecting data is established, and inviting reports of cases of trafficking, for the numbers to grow in the early years. This doesn't validate the claim that modern slavery is growing though, it might well be, but it's not definite - the SOCA numbers seem to be running at just over 300 cases per 3 month period in 2012.

It's interesting that Nigeria is always the top ranked country of origin for victims too.

 

I think the CSJ should perhaps have gone for one aspect - child slavery is a subject worth a big report on its own, and obtained some original data, along with the witness evidence.

 

Thanks for this overview, I'd only read the newspaper article and heard the snippets on the news.

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