EmS

Research Request

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Hello

 

 

My name is Emma Smith, a PhD student at the University of Stirling, researching responses to violence against sex workers in Scotland.

 

I am now at the fieldwork stage of my research, and am seeking to make contact with both sex workers and agencies currently involved in responding to violence against sex workers throughout Scotland. I am interested in examining the various perceptions, experiences, barriers, and challenges that may underpin these responses. It is anticipated that the research would contribute towards further informing public understanding of the extent and nature of violence against sex workers; enhancing and adding to current support service delivery for sex workers; highlighting new directions for future, related research and, potentially influencing positive policy development.

 

I am particularly keen to make contact with female sex workers, although interest from male, transgender or transsexual sex workers would also be welcomed. Understandably, given the nature of the research topic, issues of access to participants can be problematic. I would therefore really appreciate any expressions of interest from potential participants, in order to inform and develop the research study. All participants will be acknowledged, but remain anonymous in the research write-up.

 

The study will ideally be shaped by the experiences and needs of sex workers as far as possible. This extends to the protection of participants. Participant needs, rights and interests will be considered and prioritised at all stages of the research process. Research questions are not intended to be detrimental to participants, and it will be at the discretion of participants as to how much or little information they provide. Participant privacy and confidentiality will be respected, and participants will remain anonymous throughout the research process, and write-up.

 

My main research method is in in-depth, qualitative interviews, involving meeting participants in person. I am however, willing to be flexible regarding the methods used-online interviews can also be arranged if a face-to-face interview is unsuitable, and I am happy to travel within Scotland to accommodate a meeting place and time that is mutually convenient.  Similarly, I am happy to include the perspectives of sex workers working in other areas of the UK, for a more rounded insight into the views of sex workers on issues of violence and safety at work.

 

I will be holding interviews between now and approx. March/April 2014. Interviews in person will likely last around 1 hour. My research has also been fully approved by Stirling University Ethics Committee. Prior to interviews, participants will be provided with an information sheet, outlining aspects of the research study. Consent-verbal or written is required from participants before interviews take place.

 

If you would like any further information about the research, or about myself as a researcher, or should you have any questions or concerns related to the study, please do not hesitate to get in touch, by e-mailing me: emma.smith@stir.ac.uk

 

I look forward to hearing from all potential participants- sex workers, or individuals with direct experience of working with sex workers.

 

Kind regards,

Emma

 

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Why not do your phd on women who adore being sex workers? That way you might even do ground breaking research. Or is that too out of favour in feminist theories,

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Why not do your phd on women who adore being sex workers? That way you might even do ground breaking research. Or is that too out of favour in feminist theories,

Nah, leave her to it, let us punters carry on doing our own research

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This is the third such post in recent days, if I recall. It must be the start of the academic year and all sorts of stupid ideas are being thrown around.

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This is the third such post in recent days, if I recall. It must be the start of the academic year and all sorts of stupid ideas are being thrown around.

Yes Paul.... we can expect these requests around October time.... when courses have begun and research has to be done in earnest.

 

I once had a client called Ernest.  He was very important to me.

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I once had a client called Ernest.  He was very important to me.

 

:lol:

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I once had a client called Ernest.  He was very important to me.

 

I'm sure ..... but perhaps not quite as important as he was to himself? :)

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Hello

 

 

My name is Emma Smith, a PhD student at the University of Stirling, researching responses to violence against sex workers in Scotland.

 

I am now at the fieldwork stage of my research, and am seeking to make contact with both sex workers and agencies currently involved in responding to violence against sex workers throughout Scotland. I am interested in examining the various perceptions, experiences, barriers, and challenges that may underpin these responses. It is anticipated that the research would contribute towards further informing public understanding of the extent and nature of violence against sex workers; enhancing and adding to current support service delivery for sex workers; highlighting new directions for future, related research and, potentially influencing positive policy development.

 

I am particularly keen to make contact with female sex workers, although interest from male, transgender or transsexual sex workers would also be welcomed. Understandably, given the nature of the research topic, issues of access to participants can be problematic. I would therefore really appreciate any expressions of interest from potential participants, in order to inform and develop the research study. All participants will be acknowledged, but remain anonymous in the research write-up.

 

The study will ideally be shaped by the experiences and needs of sex workers as far as possible. This extends to the protection of participants. Participant needs, rights and interests will be considered and prioritised at all stages of the research process. Research questions are not intended to be detrimental to participants, and it will be at the discretion of participants as to how much or little information they provide. Participant privacy and confidentiality will be respected, and participants will remain anonymous throughout the research process, and write-up.

 

My main research method is in in-depth, qualitative interviews, involving meeting participants in person. I am however, willing to be flexible regarding the methods used-online interviews can also be arranged if a face-to-face interview is unsuitable, and I am happy to travel within Scotland to accommodate a meeting place and time that is mutually convenient.  Similarly, I am happy to include the perspectives of sex workers working in other areas of the UK, for a more rounded insight into the views of sex workers on issues of violence and safety at work.

 

I will be holding interviews between now and approx. March/April 2014. Interviews in person will likely last around 1 hour. My research has also been fully approved by Stirling University Ethics Committee. Prior to interviews, participants will be provided with an information sheet, outlining aspects of the research study. Consent-verbal or written is required from participants before interviews take place.

 

If you would like any further information about the research, or about myself as a researcher, or should you have any questions or concerns related to the study, please do not hesitate to get in touch, by e-mailing me: emma.smith@stir.ac.uk

 

I look forward to hearing from all potential participants- sex workers, or individuals with direct experience of working with sex workers.

 

Kind regards,

Emma

Emma,  why don't you have a go at being a sex worker yourself, since the research is obviously so important to you.  That way you will have all the info first hand and will be able to tap into your own psyche instead of someone else's?

 

For what this is worth I think this is an easy subject and a lazy one and over egged by people such as yourself.  And what is more..  when your research is over, what the fuck will you do with it when you are a manager at M&S??  Eh ?

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My name is Emma Smith, a PhD student at the University of Stirling, researching responses to violence against sex workers in Scotland.

 

I am now at the fieldwork stage of my research, and am seeking to make contact with both sex workers and agencies currently involved in responding to violence against sex workers throughout Scotland. I am interested in examining the various perceptions, experiences, barriers, and challenges that may underpin these responses. It is anticipated that the research would contribute towards further informing public understanding of the extent and nature of violence against sex workers; enhancing and adding to current support service delivery for sex workers; highlighting new directions for future, related research and, potentially influencing positive policy development.

 

I am particularly keen to make contact with female sex workers, . . .

This is different to my understanding of the word 'research', where there is a theory or hypothesis to examine. You then create an experiment or gather information with the intention of falsifying the the theory. If the theory survives the attempt at falsifiability, then the theory has been validated to a degree.

 

This project seems to be about gathering new data, which is still nebulous and ill-defined. And why introduce bias with the particular interest in female sex workers? As described it isn't research in the academic sense, although it could be with a lot of re-work.

 

As a constructive criticism, start by finding a useable and meaningful definition of what constitutes a violent act against a sex worker, as there are a lot of stupid definitions out there.

Edited by bongo
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This is different to my understanding of the word 'research', where there is a theory or hypothesis to examine. You then create an experiment or gather information with the intention of falsifying the the theory. If the theory survives the attempt at falsifiability, then the theory has been validated to a degree.

 

This project seems to be about gathering new data, which is still nebulous and ill-defined. And why introduce bias with the particular interest in female sex workers? As described it isn't research in the academic sense, although it could be with a lot of re-work.

 

As a constructive criticism, start by finding a useable and meaningful definition of what constitutes a violent act against a sex worker, as there are a lot of stupid definitions out there.

You put it so much more eloquently than I.  These people pop up on here time and again.  Why would anyone come forward to help them and compromise their own privacy?  Where is the carrot here ?

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I am sure we had a student from Stirling University last year as well with the same emphasis of violence against sex workers. Did it not end up with several people telling the then poster that their teacher is obviously biased?  Will try and search for later.

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Remind me not to ask you lot for help when I do my sex work based Phd! You mean lot! 

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Remind me not to ask you lot for help when I do my sex work based Phd! You mean lot! 

 

I've been weighing up my response to the OP's request for a few days now and am aware that mine may well be a minority view. We do certainly have a proliferation of this kind of request from time to time.

 

Are we really saying that this is not a valid subject for doctoral research? If it is, the OP appears to have framed her thoughts intelligently and taken due account of the university's ethical requirements. She also seems to be open minded, unlike some 'researchers' who pop up here. No one has to take part, after all, but I have a question as to how perceptions will ever be changed if such requests are all automatically dismissed.

 

Could it just be that something useful might possibly be added to the body of knowledge that we all know is hopelessly skewed towards an unhelpful media-led definition of sex work?

 

Just a thought.

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We would have to examine the protocol to know more.   Presumably the UoS are sponsoring the study but university ethics approval is not the same thing as approval for health-based research which this is.  This requires NRES ethics approval, and thereafter local research governance for each locality in which you conduct an interview. 

 

I don’t want to rain on the parade but you need to satisfy local research permissions before you start conducting surveys across the country, even when they’re online.  During my time working in the clinical trials, October was always swamped with students wanting to undertake a single research project; rather than qualified researchers who regularly submit studies for approval and are familiar with the stringent governance requirements. Anonymisation is particularly important with a study like yours.  A CRB check is probably in order too.  I hope you’ve got that covered. 

 

Disappointingly, your research is of the type that highlights the negative aspects of this industry. The violence with its invariable references to trafficking, pimping and drugs are not an accurate reflection of our end of the market. The demographic here is very different and we collectively work to promote the positive impact that the profession brings to society.

 

The mutual safety of the girl and the punter is sacrosanct on PN. We form the respectable end of the spectrum and the girls who post here take sensible precautions to minimise risk. Therefore I don’t think this forum is suitable for recruiting suitable participants to your study.  You should check local outreach centres locally to you for the vulnerable ‘street girls’ more susceptible to violent behaviour. They would better satisfy your inclusion criteria.

 

A survey of job satisfaction among working girls might have generated more interest on this board. 

 

That said, I wish you well in your study and I hope you return and give us a link to your findings when they’re published. 

Edited by WhilstNeroplays
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So the OP is going to ask ladies assaulted by b@stard men if the men who assulted them are b@stards and then tell us research confirms men who assault women are b@stards, complex work!

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I've been weighing up my response to the OP's request for a few days now and am aware that mine may well be a minority view. We do certainly have a proliferation of this kind of request from time to time.

 

Are we really saying that this is not a valid subject for doctoral research? If it is, the OP appears to have framed her thoughts intelligently and taken due account of the university's ethical requirements. She also seems to be open minded, unlike some 'researchers' who pop up here. No one has to take part, after all, but I have a question as to how perceptions will ever be changed if such requests are all automatically dismissed.

 

Could it just be that something useful might possibly be added to the body of knowledge that we all know is hopelessly skewed towards an unhelpful media-led definition of sex work?

 

Just a thought.

Well I share your minority view Wilderbeest. The research is clearly looking at 'responses to violence against sex workers' and she wanted views from the wg. After all, they are the experts on that topic not punters!

Many people responding probably haven't considered that the immediate response by some punters will no doubt form part of her the findings on the culture the women work in.....

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We would have to examine the protocol to know more.   Presumably the UoS are sponsoring the study but university ethics approval is not the same thing as approval for health-based research which this is.  This requires NRES ethics approval, and thereafter local research governance for each locality in which you conduct an interview. 

 

I don’t want to rain on the parade but you need to satisfy local research permissions before you start conducting surveys across the country, even when they’re online.  During my time working in the clinical trials, October was always swamped with students wanting to undertake a single research project; rather than qualified researchers who regularly submit studies for approval and are familiar with the stringent governance requirements. Anonymisation is particularly important with a study like yours.  A CRB check is probably in order too.  I hope you’ve got that covered. 

 

Disappointingly, your research is of the type that highlights the negative aspects of this industry. The violence with its invariable references to trafficking, pimping and drugs are not an accurate reflection of our end of the market. The demographic here is very different and we collectively work to promote the positive impact that the profession brings to society.

 

The mutual safety of the girl and the punter is sacrosanct on PN. We form the respectable end of the spectrum and the girls who post here take sensible precautions to minimise risk. Therefore I don’t think this forum is suitable for recruiting suitable participants to your study.  You should check local outreach centres locally to you for the vulnerable ‘street girls’ more susceptible to violent behaviour. They would better satisfy your inclusion criteria.

 

A survey of job satisfaction among working girls might have generated more interest on this board. 

 

That said, I wish you well in your study and I hope you return and give us a link to your findings when they’re published. 

Nobody wants to rain on the parade but this particular parade has a bad track record of wanting info but delivering zilch in return

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I am sure we had a student from Stirling University last year as well with the same emphasis of violence against sex workers. Did it not end up with several people telling the then poster that their teacher is obviously biased?  Will try and search for later.

No, it was a student from Nottingham University and it was about depression and PTSD.

 

http://www.punternet.com/forum/index.php/topic/29434-seeking-prostitutessex-workers-to-complete-a-dissertation-questionnaire/

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I was not trying to be negative. What I was suggesting is that this seems to be a well worn and predictable field of research into the sex industry. What I suggested is that sometimes it might be a good idea to look at other parts of the field. For example. Early research into hominids in South Africa produced no results. Everyone knew hominids worked flint, based on research of all hominid sites in Europe. Ergo, no flint tools, no hominids, no African species. It was only when a young idiot (young and highly original researcher) noticed that flint is a very rare rock in South Africa and asked a local man what was a good hard stone to work as a tool that they discovered hominid tools in the zillion and the early hominids were found.

As said above, if you look for violence in Sex workers lives, you will find it. But is it a large part, a tiny part or what? There have been recent posting about knifings and murders here on Punternet. Do they post out of shock because these are rare events, or because they want to highlight a problem women face?  Before anyone asks,  I weep for any violence and I believe one knifing is one too many.

Hence I suggested Emma do research into women who adore being a working girl, not out of malice but as a honest suggestion.

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The research is clearly looking at 'responses to violence against sex workers' and she wanted views from the wg. ...

I don't know why I'm feeling antsy and picky about EmS's project, but I am. The stated 'research' is about 'responses' as said.

 

But without defining what violence against sex workers means, then you'll end up in a blooming strange place. And I hope the ethics committee that passed this, got a usable definition. For example, the Scottish government holds that 'prostitution is a form of violence against women'. What sort of responses are there when consensual paid sex occurs - the WG shops, pays bills, and saves some and wastes some, the same as anyone else I expect, paying vets fees, buying an apartment, supporting her children etc. This is not a flippant conclusion - the view that prostitution is in itself violence is widely held by many elected representatives in Norway, Sweden and Scotland - some of the most intelligent countries in the world on various league tables. And there are many more politicians and supposed academics in England and USA with the same view.

 

I want people like EmS and her ethics committee to go up against the definition of their own government, and expose them for the vacuous pointless definition it is, as it leads to the conclusion that the response to violence is many WGs doing normal things with the money they've earned.

Edited by bongo
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How many requests have we had here like this one?  Ten?  Twenty?  A hundred?  And of all of those requests has anything proved positive in any way?  I would really like to know !  Various agendas.. research regarding a small cross section of a particular genre of the punting community which benefits who exactly?

 

i remember the hoo haa surrounding Teela Sanders and the way she twisted what punters said to her to suit her own agenda.

 

Pfft

Edited by Sarah Summers

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Don't know about all this intellectual academic stuff. just seems like a kinky way of having a punt.

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How many requests have we had here like this one?  Ten?  Twenty?  A hundred?  And of all of those requests has anything proved positive in any way?  I would really like to know !  Various agendas.. research regarding a small cross section of a particular genre of the punting community which benefits who exactly?

 

i remember the hoo haa surrounding Teela Sanders and the way she twisted what punters said to her to suit her own agenda.

 

Pfft

 

Did she? I don't remember that bit.

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Did she? I don't remember that bit.

Listen Mr. Bloom, Teela Sanders was at Leeds University when she wrote her book, and then after that, the police closed down every single parlour in Leeds.  The level of tolerance here is NIL, and the level of understanding is even nil-er.

 

 I would like to know what she did that enhanced the public's view of prostitution, because here in Leeds it went downhill fast  As a direct result of those actions by police and press, a friend of mine committed suicide.

 

A client of mine took the train from London to see Teela Sanders because he thought he was contributing to  something positive that would make change..  She interviewed him here in Leeds and he met with me later for lunch before he took the train back.  He went out of his way to assist her and what did she do?  She twisted everything he said and turned it into a lie.  He was disillusioned after that as I am now.

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Listen Mr. Bloom, Teela Sanders was at Leeds University when she wrote her book, and then after that, the police closed down every single parlour in Leeds.  The level of tolerance here is NIL, and the level of understanding is even nil-er.

 

 I would like to know what she did that enhanced the public's view of prostitution, because here in Leeds it went downhill fast  As a direct result of those actions by police and press, a friend of mine committed suicide.

 

A client of mine took the train from London to see Teela Sanders because he thought he was contributing to  something positive that would make change..  She interviewed him here in Leeds and he met with me later for lunch before he took the train back.  He went out of his way to assist her and what did she do?  She twisted everything he said and turned it into a lie.  He was disillusioned after that as I am now.

 

I'm sorry to hear that. I remember having lunch with a group of punters shortly after her book appeared - just before, possibly, as one of them, I remember, had a review copy in his hands. We all seemed to feel we had been fairly treated in the book.

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