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Lohengrin

An Interesting Metaphor...

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I had a PM from an SP today that noted that a familiar person in the industry had left the business (and here I quote) "to pursue a civilian life". It struck me as interesting how we fall back on military metaphors to describe so many aspects of our everyday existence. If you think about, are working girls and their maids somehow not in civilian life already? If not, isn't it ironic -- and this is not to have a go at anyone -- that precisely those among us who would want to normalise paid sex so it became socially acceptable would use terminology suggesting the opposite. And elsewhere, sales people refer to their work in terms of "campaigns", marketers refer to their "arsenals", all business deploy "strategies" and "tactics"...half of them turn to Sun Tze's Art of War as if it might hold the secret to corporate success. Why can't we find another source of metaphor to describe the ins and outs of the more banal aspects of our world?

 

OK, I'm musing...and possibly this doesn't have much to do with punting in MK. But aren't we all civilians...even when our trousers are around our ankles and we're handing over a twenty pound note? In fact, isn't punting the most civilian behaviour of all? Few of us want to be in the military...but almost all of us -- one way or another -- want to get laid.

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You're right, this has nothing to do with punting in MK.

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Perhaps because life is just one little battle after another, you win or you lose but either way you move on to fight the good fight, onwards and  upwards, into the breach and all that  ^_^

 

I don't know what so many military terms are used in normal non military life so much, perhaps because we all still recognise them. Word meanings to morph over time though don't they, they develop additional or entirely new meanings altogether. 

 

I guess using the word civvie generally now just means anyone who isn't in the same profession as you, regardless of what that profession is.

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You're right, this has nothing to do with punting in MK.

Interesting question posed though and as the OP is an MK punter then hey ho…I don't mind it being here 

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Likening working girls to the military, and one well known phrase in particular, they wouldn't be very popular if they ''don't like it up 'em! ;)

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It is important, really, because to imply that when she stops working, a girl then "returns" to civilian life implies that, like a solider, being a working girl is like being in a war zone for as long as she does the job and that she only returns to the civilian (de-militarised) life/zone when she leaves it. None of us here should feel comfortable with that idea, unless being a WG really is that unpalatable that it is a daily battle and if that's the case then all of us punters should be taking a long, hard look at ourselves in the mirror.

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It is important, really, because to imply that when she stops working, a girl then "returns" to civilian life implies that, like a solider, being a working girl is like being in a war zone for as long as she does the job and that she only returns to the civilian (de-militarised) life/zone when she leaves it. None of us here should feel comfortable with that idea, unless being a WG really is that unpalatable that it is a daily battle and if that's the case then all of us punters should be taking a long, hard look at ourselves in the mirror.

 

I think you make an interesting point, and it is probably worthy of broader discussion in the General discussion board, but I would add that Boondoggle was being somewhat trite by making that post above, imo this issue does apply in MK, but it applies more generally too.

 

I think maybe the military analogy, whether wanted or not relates to the fact that a WG due to the societal stigma attached to the job (a reflection of the population at large, or a percentage at any rate) has to conduct said career largely in secret, hence akin to a military operation.

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I just think this reflects our language.  Police, Fireman and even MP's might say this. We get metaphors from anywhere that has unique situations. Military sure, but also Sports (Americans are terrible for this since their sports are not very global), Medicine, Science and even Construction and Farming. The seed of the idea is good.Let's build on this foundation, until it is ripe. It ain't rocket science, nor is it brain surgery.  This idea still has a pulse, though...touch base with me later.  Be polite or you'll be in the Sin Bin (a sports metaphor itself perhaps based on religious metaphor?)

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It is important, really, because to imply that when she stops working, a girl then "returns" to civilian life implies that, like a solider, being a working girl is like being in a war zone for as long as she does the job and that she only returns to the civilian (de-militarised) life/zone when she leaves it. None of us here should feel comfortable with that idea, unless being a WG really is that unpalatable that it is a daily battle and if that's the case then all of us punters should be taking a long, hard look at ourselves in the mirror.

When I said life was a series of little battles I didn't mean in reference to being a working girl, I meant in general, for everyone. I guess for the majority then it is a little like the army in that you are to a degree segregated from "normal" society, not physically but in your head, you can't be completely open and honest with anyone other than people in the industry as the job is kept secret. Life as a wg is in no way unpalatable apart from those who know nothing about it and even then a lot of people don't give a toss anymore…but its still a risk to tell, so I don't x

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I think civvie is just a term we use to describe people not in the same line as us, especially in roles that people can never really understand what it's like unless they have done it. However much you read about war you will never truly get into the mindset of a soldier on the front line. I believe it's similar for sex workers- not quite as dramatic, but it['s a special little world! I'm hoping the women will get what I mean! :) 

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When I was a lad most of the male grown ups had served in the war and military terms abounded. On payday the admin officer would bellow "stand by your beds". Words like kit, mufti, wallah, bint, char and jankers abounded. Even the way they smoked, cig cupped in the hand was army. It may be more this than The Art of War that produced military terminology

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I think civvie is just a term we use to describe people not in the same line as us, especially in roles that people can never really understand what it's like unless they have done it. However much you read about war you will never truly get into the mindset of a soldier on the front line. I believe it's similar for sex workers- not quite as dramatic, but it['s a special little world! I'm hoping the women will get what I mean! :)

I get you ;) !!

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i think we refer to civilians because, like the military, punters and wg's are a community sharing a common experience denied to the rest of the population...

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The common element is secrecy. ie the civilians are happily going about their lives unaware of what you are doing.

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i think we refer to civilians because, like the military, punters and wg's are a community sharing a common experience denied to the rest of the population...

 

And like the military, the world of punting is full of acronyms which mean nothing to an outsider (without an explanation :eek: )

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i think we refer to civilians because, like the military, punters and wg's are a community sharing a common experience denied to the rest of the population...

You may well be right Cov, but I have always credited the term to the fact that many WGs wear something akin to a "uniform" (lingerie and stockings) at work whereas women in RL usually reserve that for special occasions. After all, I rarely hear of a non punter or retired punter being called a civvie.

Edited by Kantos Kan

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