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Irgendeiner

Solicitor V Escort (Qualified Success)

15 posts in this topic

Sorry I don't recognise anyone I know.

Not surprised that the lawyer concerned has retired.

Amazed that Tugendhat J is still on the bench (although he could possibly be the son of the one I recall).

It had to be Queens Bench as immoral contracts are unenforceable so Chancery Div. not appropriate.

Pity though; Chancery bar folk are better at bringing out all the dirt - or so someone once told me.

UP

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Goodness me!

QBD lawyers do have an appetite for detail. And a bit of dirt!

 

 

My quick summary is, for punters, Don't fuck anyone involved in the legal profession, and, for SPs:

Don't fuck any involved in the legal profession who professes more than a reasonable understanding of parking fines. More than that? -  they are probably tossers. 

UP

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Mmmm and there ends the story of a desperate money seeking hooker and a desperate and fully certified god complex solicitor. 

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http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/5041239.article?utm_source=dispatch&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=GAZ150514

 

Anyone here present recognise either party?

 

I think that I've met, professionally, at least three ladies who are law graduates, legal execs or trainee solicitors ... says something about both trades, perhaps!

 

It does indeed !

 

Can't say either party rings a bell for me, I'm appalled that the woman concerned FB messaged his daughter.  :o

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I think they are both as bad as each other in this whole saga personally. 

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I have booked an escort who was working to qualify as a solicitor with the intention of becoming a barrister.

"Back to being self-employed then", said I.

As you would expect, a really intelligent, grounded, girl.

C

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Great example of what happens when you blur the boundaries.

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As far as I am concerned, AVB can only be the recently sacked manager of the Spurs!! Never realised that he had any legal qualifications!!

 

But, then again, he was a crap football manager!

Edited by porker paul

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Goodness me!

QBD lawyers do have an appetite for detail. And a bit of dirt!

 

 

My quick summary is, for punters, Don't fuck anyone involved in the legal profession, and, for SPs:

Don't fuck any involved in the legal profession who professes more than a reasonable understanding of parking fines. More than that? -  they are probably tossers. 

UP

 

Well, I rather think that this is strong stuff for SPs:

 

There can be no doubt in my view that a prostitute can in principle claim in harassment against a client. She would not need to rely on the fact of her being a prostitute to support her claim. And the client could not rely on the mere fact of her being a prostitute as removing any likelihood of her being distressed, or as making conduct which would otherwise be oppressive and unacceptable into the opposite.

 

There is, as always, a point that is not raised in the judgment! Who is funding her solicitors and learned counsel?

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Does this then mean anything that's abusive or over the top - such as a few extra or 'annoying' text messages could be classed as harassment?

http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/s_to_u/stalking_and_harassment/#a02a

 

I remember harassment being defined as something like unwanted contact on 2 occasions, and you only have to tell them once not to contact you again?

 

Harassment

In this legal guidance, the term harassment is used to cover the 'causing alarm or distress' offences under section 2 of the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 as amended (PHA), and 'putting people in fear of violence' offences under section 4 of the PHA. The term can also include harassment by two or more defendants against an individual or harassment against more than one victim.

Although harassment is not specifically defined it can include repeated attempts to impose unwanted communications and contacts upon a victim in a manner that could be expected to cause distress or fear in any reasonable person.

The harassment of another or others can include a range of offences such as those under: the Protection from Harassment Act 1997; the Offences Against the Person Act 1861; the Sexual Offences Act 2003; and the Malicious Communications Act 1988. It is important when considering this type of offending to look at all relevant legislation when formulating charges.

Closely connected groups may also be subjected to 'collective' harassment. The primary intention of this type of harassment is not generally directed at an individual but rather at members of a group. This could include: members of the same family; residents of a particular neighbourhood; groups of a specific identity including ethnicity or sexuality, for example, the racial harassment of the users of a specific ethnic community centre; harassment of a group of disabled people; harassment of gay clubs; or of those engaged in a specific trade or profession.

Harassment of an individual can also occur when a person is harassing others connected with the individual, knowing that this behaviour will affect their victim as well as the other people that the person appears to be targeting their actions towards. This is known as 'stalking by proxy'. Family members, friends and employees of the victim may be subjected to this.

Certain groups of professionals are particularly susceptible to harassment connected with their work. These include doctors, judges, police officers, teachers and other authority and public figures. It may also involve harassment of individuals as a result of their employment by a particular employer.

Stalking

The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 created two new offences of stalking by inserting new sections 2A and 4A into the PHA 1997. The two offences are in force from 25 November 2012 and provide further options for prosecutors to consider when selecting charges. The Home Office have issued guidelines and this can be accessed via the following link: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/about-us/corporate-publications-strategy/home-office-circulars/circulars-2012/018-2012/.

Whilst there is no strict legal definition of 'stalking', section 2A (3) of the PHA 1997 sets out examples of acts or omissions which, in particular circumstances, are ones associated with stalking. These include: physical following; contacting, or attempting to contact a person by any means (this may be through friends, work colleagues, family or technology); or, other intrusions into the victim's privacy such as loitering in a particular place or watching or spying on a person.

The effect of such behaviour is to curtail a victim's freedom, leaving them feeling that they constantly have to be careful. In many cases, the conduct might appear innocent (if it were to be taken in isolation), but when carried out repeatedly so as to amount to a course of conduct, it may then cause significant alarm, harassment or distress to the victim.

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Criminal Legislation

This section covers the criminal legislation most relevant to cases of stalking and harassment.

Protection from Harassment Act 1997

The PHA was brought into force on 16 June 1997 and was amended by the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 to include two new specific offences of stalking, through the insertion of sections 2A and 4A. A court dealing with a person convicted of any offence, including those under sections 2, 2A, 4 or 4A of the PHA, may make a restraining order prohibiting the defendant from doing anything described in the order. This order can be made in addition to a custodial sentence or other sentence. The order can be especially useful in preventing continued stalking and harassment by defendants, including those who are given sentences of imprisonment.

Section 12 of the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004, as well extending the availability of restraining orders to all offences, provides the court with the power to make a restraining order even when a person has been acquitted, where the court considers it necessary to do so to protect a person from ongoing harassment from the defendant.

The PHA includes the following provisions:

  • Harassment (section 2): a summary only offence, carrying a maximum of six months' imprisonment and/or a level 5 fine;
  • Stalking (section 2A): a summary only offence, carrying a maximum of six months' imprisonment and /or a level 5 fine;
  • Fear of violence (section 4): an either way offence, carrying a maximum of five years' imprisonment and/or a fine on indictment;
  • Stalking - involving fear of violence or serious alarm or distress (section 4A): an either way offence, carrying a maximum of five years' imprisonment and/or a fine on indictment;
  • Breach of a civil injunction (section 3(6)): an either way offence, carrying the same penalty as for the section 4 offence;
  • Breach of a restraining order (section 5(5)); an either way offence, carrying the same penalty as for the section 4 offence;
  • A civil tort of harassment, created by section 3.

Section 2A and 4A stalking offences which are also racially and religiously aggravated are now also covered under section 32 of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 (CDA). 

More information is available in the Legal Guidance on Racist and Religious Crime.

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S.2 offence Harassment

The elements of the section 2 offence are:

  • a course of conduct;
  • which amounts to harassment of another; and
  • which the defendant knows, or ought to know amounts to harassment of another.

Or section 1(1A), as inserted by section 125(2) of the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 (SOCPA)

  • a course of conduct;
  • which involves harassment of two or more persons; and
  • which the defendant knows or ought to know involves harassment of those persons;
  • by which he intends to persuade any person (whether or not one of those mentioned above);
  • not to do something that he is entitled or required to do; or
  • to do something that he is not under any obligation to do.

As a summary only offence, the section 2 offence requires an information or complaint to be laid within 6 months from the time when the offence was committed, or the matter of complaint arose. The 6 months' limitation should run from the last date of the course of conduct alleged.

In determining whether the defendant ought to know that the course of conduct amounts to harassment, the question to be considered is whether a reasonable person in possession of the same information would think the course of conduct amounted to harassment of the other.

http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/s_to_u/stalking_and_harassment/#a03a

Edited by Strawberry

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K know several years ago the laws regarding harrassment were tightened up. They brought in the escalating scale rule. If harassment was reported 3 times and each time it had escalated then the police were obligated to act, they tell you too keep a diary from the first reporting. Nowadays with the technology we have it's been proven time and time again that hate assent even from afar can have devastating consequences. Texts emails and social media all have to be considered serious methods of hart assent

Edited by Chloe Kisses

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I am supposed to be helping an SP with her college law course.

 

No essay.

 

Lots of evidence of her reading posts on here when she should be writing.

 

Bless

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I am supposed to be helping an SP with her college law course.

 

No essay.

 

Lots of evidence of her reading posts on here when she should be writing.

 

Bless

Is she paying you in kind?? :)

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