Max Gentle

Study By Queen's University Belfast

15 posts in this topic

Interesting report here on BBC:
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-29663612>

 

Out of 171 sex workers who took part in the online survey, fewer than 1% said they had been forced into prostitution and only 2% agreed witht criminalising the buying of sex. Some good academic work going on there!

Edited by Max Gentle

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So, 17,500 men pay for sex in NI. Does that mean that there are 17,500 punts, or do the guys who punt more than once a year still only score 1?

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Interesting report here on BBC:

<http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-29663612>

 

Out of 171 sex workers who took part in the online survey, fewer than 1% said they had been forced into prostitution and only 2% agreed witht criminalising the buying of sex. Some good academic work going on there!

 

It is good to see confirmation of our view  that the forced figure is so low, but don't quite understand the 2% figure.

 

Why would any prostitute want it criminalised?

Edited by WykeTyke

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I'd want to know exactly what question they asked and who they asked it of.

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In the interests of shared community, and so that you don't have to, I speed read the 200+ pages of the official DoJ report.

 

There was no answer to Wyke Tykes question, which to elaborate, was why 2 of the sample wanted sexy purchasing criminalised, and bizarrely 1 of the sample wanted sexy selling itself criminalised. I kid you not, there was one sex worker in the survey that wanted the law to make herself a criminal.

 

The reason wasn't given. Perhaps she freely chose whoring for the money, but feels her life would have been better if the law had taken that choice away from her. We just don't know the reason for the outliers. All that is known is that sexy workers have opinions as diverse as any other group you can imagine.

Edited by bongo
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I'd want to know exactly what question they asked and who they asked it of.

I bet they asked the questions that would generate the answers that they wanted to hear.

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I find the figures a bit suspect on two counts.

 

!. Those 17,500 men represent just 3% of the male population in NI in the 20-70 age range – ie the range likely to use prostitutes, but the Observer British Sex Survey  http://www.punternet.com/forum/index.php/topic/36947-the-observer-sex-uncovered-2014/ suggests that 22% of men have visited a prostitute.

 

2. 171 sex workers responded to a request for interview. Now, if ALL the sex workers in NI responded to the request then the ratio of sex worker to user is just 1:100, but I would intuitively have thought that far fewer would have responded to such a request, say 1 in 4 and if so then there are about 700 sex workers in NI providing a service to 17,500 men, ie 1 to 25. I find that hard to believe!

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I find the figures a bit suspect on two counts.

 

!. Those 17,500 men represent just 3% of the male population in NI in the 20-70 age range – ie the range likely to use prostitutes, but the Observer British Sex Survey  http://www.punternet.com/forum/index.php/topic/36947-the-observer-sex-uncovered-2014/ suggests that 22% of men have visited a prostitute.

 

2. 171 sex workers responded to a request for interview. Now, if ALL the sex workers in NI responded to the request then the ratio of sex worker to user is just 1:100, but I would intuitively have thought that far fewer would have responded to such a request, say 1 in 4 and if so then there are about 700 sex workers in NI providing a service to 17,500 men, ie 1 to 25. I find that hard to believe!

A couple of quibbles -

1. the 17,500 figure ( 3% of the relevant population in NI perhaps as you say ) was quoted in the present tense in the DoJ NI Study,  the 22% in the Observer survey went for the past tense.

2. Of the 171 sex workers in the survey, 18% live in NI, but it can be inferred that a further 28% tour or travel ( or are trafficked! ) to NI to sell sexy time, giving the survey total of 46% of the sample who sell sex in NI.

 

I think this means a more realistic ratio of sellers to customers.

 

I suspect it is an excellent study, ;)

Edited by bongo

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An excellent survey and I took part as tour Belfast occasionally. It has been dismissed by the DUP as irrelevant (because it does not give the evidence they want) and the debate is currently happening in Stormont whether to put the bill through. The vote should happen soon but may be as late as Wednesday. It is not looking good and Laura is over there fighting her brave battles. 

 

**edit** 

 

Bill has been passed 81 to 10..  Bad news  :(

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That truely is bad news. I suspect that the recent opinion poll showing very large public support for the sex purchase ban had more to do with the outcome than the DoJ report you contributed to, and that politicians followed the polls. Being popular,or avoiding being unpopular, is their game.

 

I hope there's someone out there in NI putting a consoling arm around those women in the masks and Laura tonight.

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That truely is bad news. I suspect that the recent opinion poll showing very large public support for the sex purchase ban had more to do with the outcome than the DoJ report you contributed to, and that politicians followed the polls. Being popular,or avoiding being unpopular, is their game.

 

I hope there's someone out there in NI putting a consoling arm around those women in the masks and Laura tonight.

 

Yes, I would say you are right there. 

 

Out of interest, does laws from Northern Ireland have to go through the House of Lords?  And what is the usual time frame till it is active so to speak? 

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Yes, I would say you are right there. 

 

Out of interest, does laws from Northern Ireland have to go through the House of Lords?  And what is the usual time frame till it is active so to speak?

No, the law making process in NI is devolved. The process is described on www.niassembly.gov.uk. Look under the Assembly Business tab, go to Legislation, then Bills Explained. There can be references to the Supreme Court on competency questions, but apart from that, it is mechanical. Bill has to be referred by the Speaker to the Sec of State for NI for Royal Assent. Implementation date will either be immediately on RA being given or on a date in the bill itself. No idea of time scales, I am afraid.

Bad news all round. Some way to go before we get evidence based legislation.

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For those of us who haven't been following the details of the bill referred to, can someone give a one sentence summary of what is being made illegal in NI or provide a link to details. Thanks.

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For those of us who haven't been following the details of the bill referred to, can someone give a one sentence summary of what is being made illegal in NI or provide a link to details. Thanks.

Cancel that request - I've just seen the thread in the General Discussion forum. Wonder if I'm the only one who reads the forums starting at the bottom and working up.

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Cancel that request - I've just seen the thread in the General Discussion forum. Wonder if I'm the only one who reads the forums starting at the bottom and working up.

 

Probably not. Some of us punt in the same way.

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