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bobbles

Australia-New South Wales government rejects tougher laws on the sex industry

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In Australia prostitution laws are set by each state- New South Wales decriminalized prostitution in 1995 and  was in fact the model that inspired New Zealand to decriminalize prostitution. Decriminalization means that prostitution was supposed to be treated like any other business and subject just to planning restrictions which were operated by local councils, the police were kept out of regulation (largely as a result of previous widespread corruption in the NSW police who took kick-backs to allow brothels (which had previously been illegal )to operate.

Naturally there has been opposition from radical feminists, Nordic modellers and also large segments of the press to move away from decriminalization and last year a Select committee was set up to look at the operation of the law. They recommended that a licensing system be introduced and greater police powers.( http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-11-11/brothels-inquiry/6929582)

However the government has now(9th May 2016) rejected the majority of their recommendations (https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/la/papers/DBAssets/tabledpaper/webAttachments/68049/Govn%20Response%20to%20LA%20Select%20Cte%20on%20Regulation%20of%20Brothels%20Report.pdf)  and in their rejection they say “The decriminalisation of the sex work industry in NSW has achieved positive health outcomes and outreach. The NSW Government, like the Select Committee, continues to support decriminalisation as the best way of protecting sex workers and maintaining a more transparent sex work industry.”

 

Perhaps our own Home office select Committee on prostitution should take note.

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Legalising it does not necessarily make punting any better for punters
(probably loads of benefits for the WGs tho - but that is none of my concern really - they seem to be doing okay for themselves in the UK).

There are all kinds of laws that legalised brothels have to adhere to - not least the "dick check" on entry - they shine a bight light and examine your knob before your do anything with the girl (also everything is ALWAYS covered - i only like my oral without - hence i virtually never punt here in Oz) - they very rarely kiss, almost none do anal. It is also illegal to show faces on websites or list the services on offer - its a case of go in and see who is on and at what price (kissing, fingering, RO, licking nipples, etc etc you name it - costs extra - usually $50 PER extra service!!!! a 30 min punt can get very expensive out here! The WGs are pretty good looking though.

it is a punting wasteland out here - i love my trips back to the UK (3/4 months a year) and make up for it with the diverse and very talented ladies found in my homeland! 
 

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I have been through the oral and written evidence submitted to the NSW Select Committee on the regulation of brothels. There were three days of oral testimony and and 176 written submissions. There were a number of submissions from current or former sex workers ( 41 including migrant sex workers and a number of prostitutes who had worked in other Australian states and other countries) none of whom backed a licensing regime and all who thought the current decriminalised system was the best. There were very few from abolitionist organisations –and they predictably followed the usual Farley lies quoting line .

Of particular interest were contributions from women who hired male sex workers       (https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/committees/DBAssets/InquirySubmission/Summary/43974/Submission%2044%20-%20Inquiry%20into%20the%20Regulation%20of%20Brothels%20-%20Redacted%20Version.pdf https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/committees/DBAssets/InquirySubmission/Summary/41097/Submission%2069%20-%20Inquiry%20into%20the%20Regulation%20of%20Brothels%20-%20Redacted%20Version.pdf ,

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/committees/DBAssets/InquirySubmission/Summary/49998/Submission%2030%20-%20Inquiry%20into%20the%20Regulation%20of%20Brothels%20-%20Redacted%20Version.pdf

Also of interest was an academic paper which showed there was no relationship between the type of system in place, criminalised, legalized or decriminalised and the proportion of men who purchased sex. This gives the lie to the END DEMAND rhetoric that somehow criminalization will reduce the buying of sex.

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/committees/DBAssets/InquirySubmission/Summary/44962/Submission%2013%20-%20Inquiry%20into%20the%20Regulation%20of%20Brothels%20in%20NSW%20-Redacted%20Version.pdf

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The last cited paper has been published in slightly different form

 "Decriminalization of Sex Work Is Not Associated with More Men Paying for Sex: Results from the Second Australian Study of Health and Relationships  "Rissel, C.afs.gif Donovan, B.bcYeung, A.dde Visser, R.O.eGrulich, A.bSimpson, J.M.aRichters, J.

Sexuality Research and Social Policy 24 February 2016, Pages 1-6

Abstract

It has been claimed that the decriminalization of sex work may result in its proliferation, but there is no evidence to prove or disprove this claim. We investigated whether decriminalization was associated with the prevalence of paying for sex. A representative national sample of 8074 Australian men interviewed by telephone reported whether they had paid for sex ever and in the last 12 months. Cross-sectional associations between paying for sex in the last 12 months and their jurisdiction’s legal approach to sex work (criminalized, licensed, or decriminalized), were examined with logistic regression analysis, controlling for demographic variables and relationship status. Overall, 2.2 % of the men reported paying for sex in the past year—a proportion that was not statistically different by state or territory (P = 0.26). The only variable that was associated with paying for sex was not having a regular sexual partner, or to a lesser extent, not living with a regular partner. Being aged 16–19 years was associated with lower odds of paying for sex. Being a male without a regular partner was associated with paying for sex. The legal approach to sex work in the respondent’s state of residence was not associated with having paid for sex

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