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vivluvsme

So fed up with sentences starting with so - or rather...

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Posted (edited)

So for one such as me with a certain background in the English language, it was a surprise to see how the fashion for starting sentences with 'so' caught on across the English-speaking world.

So it even nearly matches Australian cricketers' inability to start a sentence with 'look' as the first word.

So why don't educated slaves to this tick realise how like unthinking slaves to pointless fads they come across as? It's the users rather than the word itself that makes me feel contempt for people's independence of mind.

So where did this use of 'so' come from?

Edited by vivluvsme

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I agree entirely, like. <_<

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That use of 'like' has a regional source I would think - scouse.

My original post should have had without 'look' rather than the opposite.

The obvious answer for the speed of the uptake of 'so' would be to ascribe it to social media but I don't see it in written form so...

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Unnecessary likes piss me off far more than so. I thought so came from academia.

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Posted (edited)

So what, like who cares innit? ;)

"To be fair" seems to be another new phase with the young uns - not sure why .....

Edited by MySecretLife
Missed a word.

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Let me make this absolutely clear......

 

And dont get me started on management bollocks.

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None as recent and all-pervasive as 'So' and I do not believe how the users do not realise how stupid they sound trying to appear with it.

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19 hours ago, MySecretLife said:

So what, like who cares innit? ;)

"To be fair" seems to be another new phase with the young uns - not sure why .....

"To be fair" is said when someone seeing something from another point of view, or in defence of what may seem like an odd / bad decision.

IMHO, the worst ones are when people say "No offence, but..." or the other one is "I'm not racist but..." and they then proceed to say something totally offensive and / or racist. Those have now become clichés for "I'm going to blatantly be rude / offensive and those couple of words supposedly make it OK to voice my offensive comment". The phrases, "I'm not being funny," or "I don't want to sound rude"  have more integrity IMHO; having said that, admittedly it can be annoying when people start every sentence with "Not being funny"

Another thing that grinds my gears is the miss-use / corruption of words... For example, people say they're literally dying when they've only cut their finger... No love, if you were literally dying, you'd be in agony on the floor or on a hospital bed.

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On ‎21‎/‎06‎/‎2016 at 5:19 PM, DirtyGit said:

"To be fair" is said when someone seeing something from another point of view, or in defence of what may seem like an odd / bad decision.

IMHO, the worst ones are when people say "No offence, but..." or the other one is "I'm not racist but..." and they then proceed to say something totally offensive and / or racist. Those have now become clichés for "I'm going to blatantly be rude / offensive and those couple of words supposedly make it OK to voice my offensive comment". The phrases, "I'm not being funny," or "I don't want to sound rude"  have more integrity IMHO; having said that, admittedly it can be annoying when people start every sentence with "Not being funny"

Another thing that grinds my gears is the miss-use / corruption of words... For example, people say they're literally dying when they've only cut their finger... No love, if you were literally dying, you'd be in agony on the floor or on a hospital bed.

Oh don't get me started on "don't get me started"..fine don't bloody start then.

Yeah agree with the word literally being used out of context..one colleague this week was really upset with my reply to them when they said " haha i literally pissed myself laughing"

I replied " What? You got bladder problems or something, you on medication? Wouldn't want to stand next to you next time you start laughing, imagine the smell!"

Oh and the lazy use of the word " Got" as in "that bloke got stabbed"..she got run over No nobody gets stabbed, he was stabbed, she was run over:angry::angry:

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Well a number of the phrases referred to above simply come under the category of exaggeration and lack of linguistic skills to avoid overused expressions. I bet the poster who cited 'to be fair' was referring to its unthinking and repeated use to start a comment rather than its use in a relevant context so giving an explanation of its sense doesn't really add to the discussion (sorry, that sounds priggish).

'So' doesn't.

By the way, I am having to become far less picky about typos now I have tried to use a smartphone to write some paragraphs on someone's behalf. I had been particularly scathing in my mind of postings on a streaming device where people wanted technical help but offered almost unintelligible explanations of their issues. I have exquisite little fingers and still nearly threw the friend's smartphone out the window as typos proliferated. However, the typo in my opening post had no such excuse. So there.

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I have a massive bugbear with the young uns at the minute who dont seem to be able to spell the word "I" yes thats right, they are misspelling a 1 character word (letter?). Such classics as:.

"so a said to him", "she doesnt know that a like a" etc etc etc

 

 

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The one that annoys me the most is "going forward".     Shut the hell up.

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I get fed up with people interviewed ending their sentence with "It's as simple as that".

 

I go on a few football forums and have noticed lots of people writing  "Should of" instead of "Should have". A really odd one is a number of people writing "loose" instead of "lose".

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32 minutes ago, COLL said:

I get fed up with people interviewed ending their sentence with "It's as simple as that".

 

I go on a few football forums and have noticed lots of people writing  "Should of" instead of "Should have". A really odd one is a number of people writing "loose" instead of "lose".

Makes you wonder whether schools these days actually teach kids the proper use of the English language.

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On 30/06/2016 at 9:03 PM, Adultcalltakers said:

I have a massive bugbear with the young uns at the minute who dont seem to be able to spell the word "I" yes thats right, they are misspelling a 1 character word (letter?). Such classics as:.

"so a said to him", "she doesnt know that a like a" etc etc etc

 

 

really?

 

(CP Goes to stab himself)

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23 minutes ago, Bob the Builder said:

Makes you wonder whether schools these days actually teach kids the proper use of the English language.

Wow, you're even more of a back number than I am if you're still talking about the proper use of the English language. The main drift - and drift it is - in the humanities in the last few decades has been to deny the idea of authority in anything.  And so there are "histories" rather than "history", and "Englishes" rather than "English", or "histories of English" rather than "the history of English". The main villain of the piece in this case is David Crystal.

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On 8/1/2016 at 7:01 PM, Bob the Builder said:

Makes you wonder whether schools these days actually teach kids the proper use of the English language.

Interesting. I wonder whether things are really worse now than they used to be. I suspect that a far greater proportion of young people with a poor command of the English language are exposing these failings to the public gaze via social media than were doing so 30 or 40 years ago.

I seem to remember that the grammatical quality and spelling of graffiti on toilet walls in years gone by left a lot to be desired, although some of this (e.g. "woz ere" and "wot") may have been a deliberate affectation.  

 

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On 6/30/2016 at 9:03 PM, Adultcalltakers said:

I have a massive bugbear with the young uns at the minute who dont seem to be able to spell the word "I" yes thats right, they are misspelling a 1 character word (letter?). Such classics as:.

"so a said to him", "she doesnt know that a like a" etc etc etc

 

 

I get irrationally annoyed by the misspelling of "definitely" as "definately" but I see as many older people doing this as people in their teens and twenties.

There has also been a trend over the last 50 years to adopt American pronunciations e.g. "privacy" and "expletive", the latter hastened I believe by the Watergate scandal and the constant references to "expletive deleted".

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On 8/1/2016 at 7:01 PM, Bob the Builder said:

Makes you wonder whether schools these days actually teach kids the proper use of the English language.

As Max Bygraves said (55 years ago), "Fings Ain't Wot They Used To Be".

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1 hour ago, Carnival said:

Interesting. I wonder whether things are really worse now than they used to be. I suspect that a far greater proportion of young people with a poor command of the English language are exposing these failings to the public gaze via social media than were doing so 30 or 40 years ago.

I seem to remember that the grammatical quality and spelling of graffiti on toilet walls in years gone by left a lot to be desired, although some of this (e.g. "woz ere" and "wot") may have been a deliberate affectation.  

 

My experience is that things have got much worse.

The company for which I have worked for many years has found it increasingly difficult to recruit young people (including graduates) who are able to produce a sentence that is even remotely cogent. As a large part of the job involves report writing this can be a major problem and while I don't have a problem in reviewing the technical content of a report, I get hugely pissed off when I have to spend just as much time correcting silly spelling and / or grammatical mistakes.

And their numerical skills are not much better.

 

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1 hour ago, Carnival said:

I get irrationally annoyed by the misspelling of "definitely" as "definately" but I see as many older people doing this as people in their teens and twenties.

There has also been a trend over the last 50 years to adopt American pronunciations e.g. "privacy" and "expletive", the latter hastened I believe by the Watergate scandal and the constant references to "expletive deleted".

Interesting. I remember those times well, and the American stressing of that word passed me by completely. (Anyone else remember Senator Sam?)

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14 hours ago, Bob the Builder said:

My experience is that things have got much worse.

The company for which I have worked for many years has found it increasingly difficult to recruit young people (including graduates) who are able to produce a sentence that is even remotely cogent. As a large part of the job involves report writing this can be a major problem and while I don't have a problem in reviewing the technical content of a report, I get hugely pissed off when I have to spend just as much time correcting silly spelling and / or grammatical mistakes.

And their numerical skills are not much better.

 

One personal observation and one theory in relation to this:

Observation: over the last 45 years working in an office I have consistently found that most young people do not write as cogently and grammatically correctly as I do. But it hasn't got noticeably worse over that time.

Theory: Perhaps only around 5-10% of school leavers leave school with an ability to write really clearly and well, and maybe that figure hasn't changed much in the last 50 years. What has changed is that, with the decline in demand for jobs requiring mainly manual labour, a much larger proportion of the remaining 90-95% now find employment in office environments which require good written communication skills.

If the above theory is correct, then given that the proportion of school leavers going to university has risen in the last 50 years from under 5% to just over 30%, it's probably not surprising that you are finding that a significant proportion of graduates lack the communication skills you are looking for.  

As I say, this is just speculation on my part. I wonder if any detailed research has been conducted on this topic.

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8 hours ago, Carnival said:

One personal observation and one theory in relation to this:

Observation: over the last 45 years working in an office I have consistently found that most young people do not write as cogently and grammatically correctly as I do. But it hasn't got noticeably worse over that time.

Theory: Perhaps only around 5-10% of school leavers leave school with an ability to write really clearly and well, and maybe that figure hasn't changed much in the last 50 years. What has changed is that, with the decline in demand for jobs requiring mainly manual labour, a much larger proportion of the remaining 90-95% now find employment in office environments which require good written communication skills.

If the above theory is correct, then given that the proportion of school leavers going to university has risen in the last 50 years from under 5% to just over 30%, it's probably not surprising that you are finding that a significant proportion of graduates lack the communication skills you are looking for.  

As I say, this is just speculation on my part. I wonder if any detailed research has been conducted on this topic.

The OECD produced a report in 2015 which concluded, inter alia, that:

  • based on maths and science at age 15, the UK was ranked 20th out of 76 countries;
  • the top 5 performing countries were all Asian (Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan and Taiwan);
  • in the UK, the study shows about one in five youngsters leave school without reaching a basic level of education.
     

A report produced by Pearson in 2014 again showed that:

  • the top 4 performers were South Korea, Japan, Singapore and Hong Kong;
  • these countries education systems were said to ... prize effort above inherited ‘smartness’, have clear learning outcomes and goalposts, and have a strong culture of accountability and engagement among a broad community of stakeholders
  • the UK was ranked 6th.

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8 hours ago, Carnival said:

One personal observation and one theory in relation to this:

Observation: over the last 45 years working in an office I have consistently found that most young people do not write as cogently and grammatically correctly as I do. But it hasn't got noticeably worse over that time.

Theory: Perhaps only around 5-10% of school leavers leave school with an ability to write really clearly and well, and maybe that figure hasn't changed much in the last 50 years. What has changed is that, with the decline in demand for jobs requiring mainly manual labour, a much larger proportion of the remaining 90-95% now find employment in office environments which require good written communication skills.

If the above theory is correct, then given that the proportion of school leavers going to university has risen in the last 50 years from under 5% to just over 30%, it's probably not surprising that you are finding that a significant proportion of graduates lack the communication skills you are looking for.  

As I say, this is just speculation on my part. I wonder if any detailed research has been conducted on this topic.

Universities are moaning that they are having to teach 1st year students basic grammar, spelling and maths. WTF are they admitting people without these skills?

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1 minute ago, Coventrypunter said:

Universities are moaning that they are having to teach 1st year students basic grammar, spelling and maths. WTF are they admitting people without these skills?

Money?

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