DirtyGit

Old fashioned insults and swear words

62 posts in this topic

Hi all,

I got called a Nincompoop the other day... and when I stopped laughing, it got me thinking that there are some words you just never hear these days, and this then led to the following:-

               1) How innocent (and cute) it sounds compared to the complete filth / abuse that people hurl at each other these days

               2) How certain words (not just insults) tend to go in and out of fashion.

Has anyone else got any other "old-skool" swear words, that were no longer used but by todays standards sound absolutely ridiculous.

 

I'll leave this to you now, you bunch of wally's :P 

 

 

 

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Not a swear word, but a word I have only had the opportunity to use once in my life. Speaking to a colleague, I described someone in administration as a jackanapes. It was perfect - no other word would have summed him up quite as well.

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Ive been known call the odd human whos no showed me a pipsqueak ...occasionally, because they are

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If we misbehaved and created a mess as kids we were sometimes referred to as "hooligans and guttersnipes".

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Has "twerp" disappeared from the common language? It's certainly a long time since I've heard it. It doesn't look like it, but this is following on from Carnival's post, as the last time I heard it may have been when I was about ten years old and a friendly uncle affectionately upbraided me for some minor misdemeanour,.

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Has "twerp" disappeared from the common language? It's certainly a long time since I've heard it. It doesn't look like it, but this is following on from Carnival's post, as the last time I heard it may have been when I was about ten years old and a friendly uncle affectionately upbraided me for some minor misdemeanour,.

I've used it but not often. My main word of choice is Twat with the occasional f word preceding

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I've used it but not often. My main word of choice is Twat with the occasional f word preceding

I tend to restrict using the word Twat (usually preceded by the word stupid) to those who have really pissed me off. For those who piss me off only moderately I tend to use the word tosser.

A friend of mine often comes out with the word Wazzock or Wazz for short.

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I've used it but not often. My main word of choice is Twat with the occasional f word preceding

Now I don't use this word as it also can mean cunt.  Twit on the other hand is lovely.

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Nit and nitwit I don't think are much used now.

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Nit and nitwit I don't think are much used now.

Nor is ninny.

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I tend to restrict using the word Twat (usually preceded by the word stupid) to those who have really pissed me off. For those who piss me off only moderately I tend to use the word tosser.

A friend of mine often comes out with the word Wazzock or Wazz for short.

Is he from Yorkshire. That word appears in "Capstick Comes Home", the Hovis advert parody that made it to Number 3 in the UK singles chart in 1981

We stumbled into t'house and stood there freezin' cold and tired out, shiverin' and miserable, in front o' t' meagre fire.
Any road, mi mam says "Cheer up, lads. I've got you some nice brown bread and butter for yer tea."
Ee, mi father went crackers. He reached out and gently pulled mi mam towards 'im by t'throat. "You big fat, idle ugly wart", he said. "You gret useless spawny-eyed parrot-faced wazzock." ('E had a way wi words, mi father. He'd bin to college, y'know)

 

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is fuckwit old or is it a viz creation?

one when I was a kid in leeds was cuntchops, which seems a odd insult.

is 'soft' still used to mean a bit daft, as opposed to being a bit of a walter?

but my fave insult was 'soft southern shandy drinking puff'

I have a book somewhere where someone has extracted and catalogued all the insults from shakespeare.  Toby belch tells andrew agucheek in 12th night that his hair hangs like flax on a  distaff, i.e lank  but there are hundreds.

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Posted (edited)

 

Is he from Yorkshire. That word appears in "Capstick Comes Home", the Hovis advert parody that made it to Number 3 in the UK singles chart in 1981

We stumbled into t'house and stood there freezin' cold and tired out, shiverin' and miserable, in front o' t' meagre fire.
Any road, mi mam says "Cheer up, lads. I've got you some nice brown bread and butter for yer tea."
Ee, mi father went crackers. He reached out and gently pulled mi mam towards 'im by t'throat. "You big fat, idle ugly wart", he said. "You gret useless spawny-eyed parrot-faced wazzock." ('E had a way wi words, mi father. He'd bin to college, y'know)

 

No - he's Scottish.

Edited by Bob the Builder

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I tend to restrict using the word Twat (usually preceded by the word stupid) to those who have really pissed me off. For those who piss me off only moderately I tend to use the word tosser.

A friend of mine often comes out with the word Wazzock or Wazz for short.

mildly annoying are prats

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Posted (edited)

 

 

Wrong post

Edited by robert49

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This is my new favourite word for a brothel - a cunny warren. I follow a Twitter account called Haggard Hawks, some of the olde worlde words are hilarious! 

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There's a fine all-encompassing set in 'King Lear'....

"Thou art a base, proud, shallow, beggarly, three-suited, hundred-pound, filthy worsted-stocking knave; a lily-liver'd, action-taking, whoreson, glass-gazing, superserviceable, finical rogue; one-trunk-inheriting slave; one that wouldst be a bawd in way of good service, and art nothing but the composition of a knave, beggar, coward, pandar, and the son and heir of a mungril bitch."

And a couple more from Henry IV Part 1...

“That trunk of humours, that bolting-hutch of beastliness, that swollen parcel of dropsies, that huge bombard of sack, that stuffed cloak-bag of guts, that roasted Manningtree ox with pudding in his belly, that reverend vice, that grey Iniquity, that father ruffian, that vanity in years?”

“You starvelling, you eel-skin, you dried neat’s-tongue, you bull’s-pizzle, you stock-fish–O for breath to utter what is like thee!-you tailor’s-yard, you sheath, you bow-case, you vile standing tuck!”

 

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What about the word "berk"

last heard that in the 70s

 

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And, apart in the odd costume drama, one never hears words like "cad" and "bounder". 

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And, apart in the odd costume drama, one never hears words like "cad" and "bounder". 

I'd been thinking about that too. I think the whole moral code and code of social behaviour have changed so much they've been put out of business. How many of us would even be able to explain the distinction clearly? James Hewitt may have been the last person the words were used of. It provoked this explanation in the Indy:  " a bounder was the sort of officer who would sleep with a brother officer's wife but might then go out and win a VC, whereas a cad would sleep with the lady while his brother officer was out winning a VC."

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Carrying on from the last point - "scapegrace" would hardly be recognized now, but are even "rogue" and "rascal" used seriously? It's odd that so many words that suggest moral disapproval seem no longer usable. It's as if we no longer feel confident in our moral language. "Scoundrel" I have heard just once used seriously (about 20 years ago by a woman).

From what little I know, the equivalents of these words are still in good health in other European languages. Don't we tend just to fall back on less precise terms like shit and prick etc? (A distinction made to me over thirty years ago by a friend, which cricketing fans will at once understand: "Botham is a prick, but Willis is a cunt".

Robert Conquest had a usefully precise limerick on this subject:

A usage that's seldom got right

Is when to say shit, and when shite;

And many a chap

Will fall back on crap,

Which is vulgar, evasive and trite.

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What about the word "berk"

last heard that in the 70s

 

Rhyming slang, of course, from Berkshire Hunt. Now we just cut to the chase and say cunt.

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Surprisingly I don't think anyone has yet mentioned "pillock". I suppose because it's still regularly used?

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Any takers for "scallywag"? (back in the 90s a shortlived satirical magazine).

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Rhyming slang, of course, from Berkshire Hunt. Now we just cut to the chase and say cunt.

Thanks - so when my teacher called me a "great steaming berk" now I know excatly what he meant

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