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Carnival

Sex industry could be decriminalised under plan discussed by Lib Dems

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A 33-page policy consultation paper, which will  go before the party’s autumn conference in Brighton this month, argues that the “criminalisation” of sex workers is drawing vulnerable people into the justice system and encouraging some to take greater risks by working alone. 

More details at http://www.standard.co.uk/news/politics/sex-industry-could-be-decriminalised-under-plan-discussed-by-lib-dems-a3339831.html

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4 hours ago, Beaugiles said:

Thanks for this Beaugiles - an interesting read. I see that it will be the subject of a Consultative Session within the LibDem Party Conference which will take place on Saturday 17 September in parallel with another consultative session on nuclear weapons.

According to the LibDem Party Conference programme:

Consultative sessions provide a less formal mechanism than the full-scale conference debates for conference representatives and other Party members to participate in the Party’s policy- and decision-making process. Each session examines a particular topic and hears contributions from Party members and in some cases outside speakers.

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er. this is the limp dumps.   will anyone take a blind bit of notice of this?

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1 hour ago, Coventrypunter said:

er. this is the limp dumps.   will anyone take a blind bit of notice of this?

It's a good point.

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15 hours ago, Coventrypunter said:

er. this is the limp dumps.   will anyone take a blind bit of notice of this?

This is the most balanced and sensible document, about the law on prostitution, I have read in years and I hope it is adopted by their conference. I am thinking about sending them a few quid to join the party, not becuse of this but because they have made good policy statements in other areas and I am impressed by their leader.

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25 minutes ago, Dave451 said:

This is the most balanced and sensible document, about the law on prostitution, I have read in years and I hope it is adopted by their conference. I am thinking about sending them a few quid to join the party, not becuse of this but because they have made good policy statements in other areas and I am impressed by their leader.

impressed by Farron? Jeez.

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2 hours ago, Dave451 said:

This is the most balanced and sensible document, about the law on prostitution, I have read in years and I hope it is adopted by their conference. I am thinking about sending them a few quid to join the party, not becuse of this but because they have made good policy statements in other areas and I am impressed by their leader.

Be that as it may, the chances of the sex industry being decriminalised, at least in the immediately foreseeable future, are somewhere between nil and non-existent.

And as for Farron - he brings a whole new meaning to the word non-entity.

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2 minutes ago, Bob the Builder said:

Be that as it may, the chances of the sex industry being decriminalised, at least in the immediately foreseeable future, are somewhere between nil and non-existent.

And as for Farron - he brings a whole new meaning to the word non-entity.

bob

paying for sex in the UK is quite legal

OK certain aspects of it are illegal:-

kerbcrawling

seeing a prostitute forced to work

 

OK with those 2.

the brothel law is silly and needs revisiting.  but a provision against abusive pimping would help I think.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Coventrypunter said:

bob

paying for sex in the UK is quite legal

OK certain aspects of it are illegal:-

kerbcrawling

seeing a prostitute forced to work

 

OK with those 2.

the brothel law is silly and needs revisiting.  but a provision against abusive pimping would help I think.

 

 

The fact that the law is an ass - in this and other areas - is well known. I was, for the sake of convenience, using the same terminology as the OP.

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At the LibDem Conference on 17 September , the following motion was passed with no amendments:

Conference expresses concern that:

i) Laws regarding solicitation and loitering force sex workers into isolated areas where they are at more danger of sexual and physical violence.
ii) Laws prohibiting brothel-keeping prevent sex workers from working out of the same premises to ensure their own safety.
iii) Raids of saunas in Edinburgh and London were orchestrated with publicity in mind - including inviting the press to the raids in Soho in December 2013 - rather than for the welfare and privacy of the women in sex work.
iv) Studies promoting the criminalisation of clients or 'demand' often conflate legal migrants of an ethnic minority background with trafficked women in a way that is tantamount to racism.
v) Approaches which criminalise the purchase of sexual services but not, overtly, the workers themselves, criminalise otherwise law abiding people and divert criminal justice resources away from serious harms in society, including young people in care homes at risk of grooming, victims of trafficking, and migrant workers in domestic - and sometimes sexual - servitude.
vi) The enforcement of the above approach in the 'Nordic' approach in Scandinavian countries had no appreciable effect in preventing violence against women or poverty, and has reduced negotiating power that street workers previously had.
vii) Just as the criminalisation of homosexuality and abortion leads to unsafe practices regarding LGBT and women's healthcare respectively, criminalisation of sex work leads to unsafe sexual health practices.
viii) Immigration status, and not the welfare of women suspected of being trafficked, is currently a priority within police forces.
ix) Sex workers invariably fear state violence and police brutality more than they fear violence from people masquerading as clients, or from members of the public.

Conference believes that:

A. Laws against rape and sexual violence need to be strongly enforced, especially against people suspected of trafficking others.
B. There should be no bar towards consensual sexual activities between any number of adults.
C. Every person has a right to bodily autonomy, and it is not for the State to decide what a they can or cannot do with their body, including engage in sex work if they so choose.
D. The abolition of sex work is not practically feasible without fully eradicating circumstances related to economic hardship, and cannot be sought through any prohibition on consensual sex work.
E. Decriminalisation of sex work would help engender better working conditions and sexual health practices among workers.
F. Decriminalisation would also help foster a positive culture where the importance of informed and enthusiastic consent is paramount.
G. It is our responsibility as liberals to ensure that the most disadvantaged people in society are fought for just as hard as the least, and it is key that we should sometimes just amplify their voices instead of offering our own.

Conference calls for:

1. Continued support the principles in policy paper 3 and the establishment of a Working Group to prepare an updated version of the policy paper that deals with the issue of sex work in the 21st Century.

2. In the interim, opposition to any steps to implement the Nordic model and reaffirmation of our support for decriminalisation of sex work, protections for survivors of violence against women, and the promotion of safer sexual health practices and better sex and relationship ethics, including in all tiers of the education system.

3. The 'Merseyside model', in which crimes against sex workers are treated as hate crimes, to be rolled out nationwide.4. The promotion of solutions to the problem of international trafficking and forced prostitution that do not endanger the lives of sex workers.

5. Work to be taken in conjunction with sex worker organisations to ensure the safety of workers, including reintroducing the Ugly Mugs scheme on a more permanent basis.

6. For our commitment for strong social and community safety nets to be reaffirmed, so that no person should be pressured to enter or be afraid to exit sex work at any time.

Full details at http://www.libdems.org.uk/f9_towards_safer_sex_work# where you can also watch a video of the debate.

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4 hours ago, Colonel Bonkers said:

And what a completely irrelevant stock picture (the second one) they choose to illustrate the article!

No not irrelevant at all.  At least not if your intention is to depict sex work as violence perpertrated by men on women who have no choice and are kept in rooms miserably waiting to be abused again.

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Thanks Carnival. That is encouraging.

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On 10/09/2016 at 0:43 AM, Carnival said:

A 33-page policy consultation paper, which will  go before the party’s autumn conference in Brighton this month, argues that the “criminalisation” of sex workers is drawing vulnerable people into the justice system and encouraging some to take greater risks by working alone. 

More details at http://www.standard.co.uk/news/politics/sex-industry-could-be-decriminalised-under-plan-discussed-by-lib-dems-a3339831.html

The LibDems are currently further refining policy on sex work based on evidence they receive until the end of 2016. You can contribute to that evidence via a simple survey at https://libdems.getfeedback.com/r/cswPSnJ4

Their final policy paper will be published in February 2017 and will be debated at their spring conference in York in March 2017.

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They had a similar discussion in previous years, looks like they are staying with it. 

 

 

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