SaSfan

FAO JohnSheppard

18 posts in this topic

Well taking money for sexual services!

Isnt that whats always on the news when WG's are getting arrested?

It appears that the thread has been deleted, so I have answered in a new thread.

Ah, I see, just a couple of points, firstly soliciting is not the supply of sexual services for gain, the supply of sexual services for gain is prostitution, that is not an arrestable offence, soliciting is offering sexual services for gain and is an arrestable offence.

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It appears that the thread has been deleted, so I have answered in a new thread.

Ah, I see, just a couple of points, firstly soliciting is not the supply of sexual services for gain, the supply of sexual services for gain is prostitution, that is not an arrestable offence, soliciting is offering sexual services for gain and is an arrestable offence.

Ah my mistake sorry.

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Great point! To make it clear - for an independent lady there is absolutely no legal hindrance to offer her services via her site as well as directories. She can be as coy or as blatantly open about the nature of those services. It is legal to sell sex and work as an escort/prostitute etc here in the UK. And as many recent examples have shown the police is very sympathetic to ladies who report any crimes such as violent clients or those trying to steal and/or forcibly try to take their fee back.

It is however not legal to overstep boundaries and attempt to enforce services. There are also various new proposals to current law with regards to the client seeking the services of someone who is forced into prostitution. Any protestation by the client that he did not know that the lady he saw was not offering the service voluntarily in those proposals will not actually count in his defence. When a lady appears particularly unprepared to offer a service and/or seems really reluctant, in conjunction with very low rates that suggest a high turnover then clients need to become more ethical in their stance.

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Three points

1) Soliciting usually means propositioning a client in person, in a bar or on the street; the latter is illegal.

2) Although prostitution is legal, agreements relating to the provision of sexual services are 'illegal contracts' meaning that the law cannot be used to enforce them

3) If a deal -£70 for one hour, myriad repeated services, for example- looks too good to be true, it probably is too good to be true.

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I was just wondering if any moderator could explain why it was deleted? As I contributed to that thread, I'd like to know if I broke any rules so that I can make sure that such behaviour won't be repeated.

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2) Although prostitution is legal, agreements relating to the provision of sexual services are 'illegal contracts' meaning that the law cannot be used to enforce them

The contract is legal, this is because neither side of the contract (the supply and the purchase of sexual services) is illegal, however the sexual services content makes the contract immoral and an immoral contract is not legally enforceable.

This was highlighted in the case Inland Revenue Commissioners v Aken - Court of Appeal 1990

The judges decided that prostitution is a trade.

"It consists in the supply of services for reward on a commercial basis. Although the bargains made between the prostitute and her clients are unenforceable as being contra bonos mores neither the bargains made nor the services supplied are illegal in the sense of being prohibited either at common law or by statute and made subject to either civil or criminal sanctions. Both bargains and services are immoral, but that is all."

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In this case would the contract not also be unenforcable because it could be argued that it unreasonably penalised one party, in that (to my mind) the lady agreed a price for services that represented something less than 50% of what could be established as the market rate for those services ? is there not provision in contract law for the contract to nulled if something of this nature can be shown ?

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In this case would the contract not also be unenforcable because it could be argued that it unreasonably penalised one party, in that (to my mind) the lady agreed a price for services that represented something less than 50% of what could be established as the market rate for those services ? is there not provision in contract law for the contract to nulled if something of this nature can be shown ?

I have no idea at all, my knowledge of Contract law is virtually nil.

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In this case would the contract not also be unenforcable because it could be argued that it unreasonably penalised one party, in that (to my mind) the lady agreed a price for services that represented something less than 50% of what could be established as the market rate for those services ? is there not provision in contract law for the contract to nulled if something of this nature can be shown ?
A sale is legal provided something is offered and accepted and "equity" is exchanged. THe vbalue of the equity is irrelevant to legality otherwise peppercorn rents, where the rent is literally a peppercorn, would be invalid and they most certainly are not. This is the common law as it stands, there are however statute laws that supecede this, for example the sale of goods acts etc, and some of these have specific clauses to protect the individual from being fleeced. I can't however see these laws being applicable to the sale of sexual services, though I would laugh at trying to get a refund as the goods were not of merchantable quality :eek:

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A sale is legal provided something is offered and accepted and "equity" is exchanged.

I think that you meant to say that as a general rule a contract requires an offer, acceptance and "consideration".

"Equity" does not come in to it.

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why was the thread deleted?

Probably because it got quite ugly

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A sale is legal provided something is offered and accepted and "equity" is exchanged. THe vbalue of the equity is irrelevant to legality otherwise peppercorn rents, where the rent is literally a peppercorn, would be invalid and they most certainly are not. This is the common law as it stands, there are however statute laws that supecede this, for example the sale of goods acts etc, and some of these have specific clauses to protect the individual from being fleeced. I can't however see these laws being applicable to the sale of sexual services, though I would laugh at trying to get a refund as the goods were not of merchantable quality :eek:

No, i think a contract to provide services is different from the sale of goods & covered under different statutes.

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.....soliciting is offering sexual services for gain and is an arrestable offence.

Er, hang on a mo' ! Soliciting is only an offence if done in a public place, or a place to which the public has access.

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... agreements relating to the provision of sexual services are 'illegal contracts' meaning that the law cannot be used to enforce them

One point!

Illegal means if you do it you can be prosecuted as a criminal, and if the prosecutor gets home, you can go to prison.

Unlawful means that the civil law won't help you! Either your victim can sue you for compensation, or, if you are the victim, you may find that whatever right you seek to enforce turns to water in your hand!

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Er, hang on a mo' ! Soliciting is only an offence if done in a public place, or a place to which the public has access.

Yes.  ‏  ‏  ‏  

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One point!

Illegal means if you do it you can be prosecuted as a criminal, and if the prosecutor gets home, you can go to prison.

Unlawful means that the civil law won't help you! Either your victim can sue you for compensation, or, if you are the victim, you may find that whatever right you seek to enforce turns to water in your hand!

I am not a lawyer, but think you will find that the term 'Illegal Contract' does not mean that the contract is criminal, merely that the law cannot be used to enforce it (i.e it is merely unlawful in your terminalogy). See e.g. http://www.gillhams.com/dictionary/442.cfm which states, inter alia that illegal contracts include (a) those that are damaging to the insitutation of marriage and (:eek: promote sexual immorality.

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Probably because it got quite ugly

So why is Bruce Forsyth still on the telly, then? :P

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