elrond

Questions in parliament

20 posts in this topic

John Barrett (Edinburgh West, Liberal Democrat) | Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent research she has commissioned on the links between prostitution and trafficking.

Alan Campbell (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Home Office; Tynemouth, Labour) | Hansard source

To inform the Government's Tackling the Demand for Prostitution: A Review, the Home Office commissioned research from the child and woman abuse studies unit at London metropolitan university which compared prostitution regimes across nine countries. This considered the impact of trafficking on the development of these regimes and the effect of each regime on levels of trafficking. We also commissioned a Rapid Evidence Assessment to look at existing research on the demand for prostitution. This considered the extent to which trafficking contributed to the demand for prostitution and the effect of different approaches to tackling demand on levels of trafficking. These reports will be published this year.

John Barrett (Edinburgh West, Liberal Democrat) | Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she intends to make changes to the legal status of brothels.

Click on the platypus!

Alan Campbell (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Home Office; Tynemouth, Labour) | Hansard source

We do not intend to make changes to the legal status of brothels.

John Barrett (Edinburgh West, Liberal Democrat) | Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what consideration her Department has given to research on the likely effects of criminalising prostitution in preparing the Crime and Policing Bill.

Click on the platypus!

Alan Campbell (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Home Office; Tynemouth, Labour) | Hansard source

We do not intend to criminalise prostitution and have not considered the likely effects of doing so. The Government's 'Tackling the Demand for Prostitution: A Review' considered the most effective way of reducing the demand for prostitution and as a result of its findings we intend to include the offence of paying for sexual services of a prostitute controlled for gain in the forthcoming Policing and Crime Bill.

John McDonnell (Hayes & Harlington, Labour) | Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the average age of those first entering into prostitution.

Click on the platypus!

Alan Campbell (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Home Office; Tynemouth, Labour) | Hansard source

The Government's consultation paper on prostitution, Paying the Price, provides a summary of research on the age of first involvement in prostitution. This paper is available at:

John McDonnell (Hayes & Harlington, Labour) | Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of people who have been trafficked who are (a) in the UK and (:mad: working as prostitutes in the UK.

Click on the platypus!

Alan Campbell (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Home Office; Tynemouth, Labour) | Hansard source

The nature of the crime makes it difficult to provide an accurate assessment of the scale of the problem faced by the United Kingdom.

The latest estimate is that at any one time in 2003 there were up to 4,000 women in the UK who had been trafficked for the purpose of sexual exploitation.

We have no estimate of the scale of trafficking for non sexual purposes.

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Obviously from They Work for You. Got a direct link, as searching can be quite long winded (can pull up a huge number of results) & I like access to the Hansard source material (abolitionists can't argue it's misquoted).

Thanks

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Lord Faulkner in the House of lords asked some questions on number trafficked, control, brothels closed and street works prosecuted for soliciting.

http://www.theyworkforyou.com/search/?s=prostitution+section:wrans&o=d

If any on thinks prosecuting someone for trafficking internally is a joke, then you will see for 2007 more were prosecuted for internal trafficking. 7 innto the country, and 18 inside the country. The numbers found guilty were significantly less.

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Lord Faulkner in the House of lords asked some questions on number trafficked, control, brothels closed and street works prosecuted for soliciting.

http://www.theyworkforyou.com/search/?s=prostitution+section:wrans&o=d

If any on thinks prosecuting someone for trafficking internally is a joke, then you will see for 2007 more were prosecuted for internal trafficking. 7 innto the country, and 18 inside the country. The numbers found guilty were significantly less.

Hmmmm, from the questions he's asking it seems he's setting up to take on the proposals on the basis that there will be very few people prosecuted using them, since you would need to get convictions under the offences he's listed FIRST before going after clients. I've written to him outlining my opinion, and he responded saying that he agreed with most of what I'd written. Felt like asking him what he disagreed with :-) but I think it was just a caveat to cover himself. I wrote about strict liability and how this will be a bit of a first for this sort of offence to carry that clause. Also told him about HH and JS banging on about trafficking and forced sex and yet writing legislation which covers neither of those things directly. Instead it covers just about everybody. ETC. ETC. I think all the arguments we've been making on here are well known by now, so it's just a case of waiting to see how JS responds to those questions when they're put directly.

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The recent article below has some interesting comments, including

Legislation on prostitution in the last session of parliament was pushed back because those opposed to it argued that it could be brought forward for more thoughtful consideration in this session. The new session has arrived, and so has the revised and extended legislation. For the other side, academic and campaigner for the rights of working women, Belinda Brooks-Gordon, suggested that the opposition to government proposals was also far readier than it had been a year ago.

Unfortunately, John McDonnell MP won't be there on Monday as he had to play with the mace yesterday :mad:.

The link to the article:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/01/14/lordy_gosh/

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The recent article below has some interesting comments, including

Unfortunately, John McDonnell MP won't be there on Monday as he had to play with the mace yesterday :mad:.

The link to the article:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/01/14/lordy_gosh/

yes, I started a thread on that - not the end of the world as there are plenty of other people opposed and I'm sure he'll be working in the background to make sure that everything that needs to be said, is said. He will of course be there for the 3rd reading and the Committee stage will be unaffected largely. Then there's the Lords. The conservatives seem to be officially opposed to it, since Dominic Grieve has said it'll drive the business underground. Not a fatal loss, but still bad timing.

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yes, I started a thread on that - not the end of the world as there are plenty of other people opposed and I'm sure he'll be working in the background to make sure that everything that needs to be said, is said. He will of course be there for the 3rd reading and the Committee stage will be unaffected largely. Then there's the Lords. The conservatives seem to be officially opposed to it, since Dominic Grieve has said it'll drive the business underground. Not a fatal loss, but still bad timing.

How long do you reckon we have till the 3rd reading? One month or thereabouts? Would the voting be on the day of the 3rd reading? Sorry for the boring questions, and I know that it must go through the Lords as well, but I must say adieu to my favourites in a timely manner in case the worst comes to pass :mad:.

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How long do you reckon we have till the 3rd reading? One month or thereabouts? Would the voting be on the day of the 3rd reading? Sorry for the boring questions, and I know that it must go through the Lords as well, but I must say adieu to my favourites in a timely manner in case the worst comes to pass :mad:.

If the Bill is defeated at the second reading it can progress no further.

If the Bill is passed on the second reading there is typically two to four weeks before the committee stage then another two weeks before the report stage which is usually immediately followed by the third reading. If passed at the third reading it then passes to the House of Lords where it goes through similar stages and may be amended and passed back to the House of Commons.

You can see the progress and access all the amendments etc. here:

http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2008-09/policingandcrime.html

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If the Bill is defeated at the second reading it can progress no further.

If the Bill is passed on the second reading there is typically two to four weeks before the committee stage then another two weeks before the report stage which is usually immediately followed by the third reading. If passed at the third reading it then passes to the House of Lords where it goes through similar stages and may be amended and passed back to the House of Commons.

You can see the progress and access all the amendments etc. here:

http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2008-09/policingandcrime.html

Many thanks for the detailed response! Seems I must get a move on...

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John Barrett (Edinburgh West, Liberal Democrat) | Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent research she has commissioned on the links between prostitution and trafficking.

Alan Campbell (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Home Office; Tynemouth, Labour) | Hansard source

To inform the Government's Tackling the Demand for Prostitution: A Review, the Home Office commissioned research from the child and woman abuse studies unit at London metropolitan university which compared prostitution regimes across nine countries. This considered the impact of trafficking on the development of these regimes and the effect of each regime on levels of trafficking. We also commissioned a Rapid Evidence Assessment to look at existing research on the demand for prostitution. This considered the extent to which trafficking contributed to the demand for prostitution and the effect of different approaches to tackling demand on levels of trafficking. These reports will be published this year.

hm, sounds like we can expect more feminist propaganda, the "nine countries study" indicates that the infamous Melissa Farley piece has been used as source:

Prostitution & Trafficking in Nine Countries: an Update on Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

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Dominic Grieve also has been preparing.

Dominic Grieve (Shadow Attorney General, Law Officers; Beaconsfield, Conservative) | Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) arrests and (:rolleyes: convictions there have been for human trafficking offences as a result of the activity of the Metropolitan Police human trafficking unit in each of the last two years.

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Jacqui Smith (Home Secretary; Redditch, Labour) | Hansard source

Figures from the Metropolitan police indicate that in 2007-08, the MPS human trafficking unit made a total of 33 arrests for human trafficking offences The figures from the Met indicate that to date there have been eight convictions within the last two years for human trafficking with six others being convicted of related offences such as controlling prostitution.

It is not possible to detail the outcome of all cases as many are still progressing through the criminal justice system.

Dominic Grieve (Shadow Attorney General, Law Officers; Beaconsfield, Conservative) | Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the average sentence was for those convicted of human trafficking offences over the last five years.

Save Parliamentary transparency

Urgent: we need your help!

Jacqui Smith (Home Secretary; Redditch, Labour) | Hansard source

The sentences imposed by the courts on those convicted of human trafficking ranges from suspended sentences to 14 years imprisonment.

The average length of sentence however for the offence of human trafficking is 4.69 years although it should be noted in many cases those convicted are serving longer terms of imprisonment as result of convictions for other related offences such as rape, inciting prostitution or immigration related offences.

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"Jacqui Smith (Home Secretary; Redditch, Labour) | Hansard source

Figures from the Metropolitan police indicate that in 2007-08, the MPS human trafficking unit made a total of 33 arrests for human trafficking offences The figures from the Met indicate that to date there have been eight convictions within the last two years for human trafficking with six others being convicted of related offences such as controlling prostitution.

It is not possible to detail the outcome of all cases as many are still progressing through the criminal justice system.".........

So a true picture immerges of the actual number trafficked if we knew the actual total number of people in prostitution would be revealed. (Government too happy to massage figures to their own advantage when they originally quoted 80% were trafficked)

If you investigate some of these figures your self, and bearing in mind we have not collated all the figures in all the reports to truely present them properly, with 8 million people in london, and around 4,000 prostitutes then you can more accurately report that if the arrest figures are met (and so London arrests only) A truer picture of London would be...

(33/4000x100 = 0.825%) 0.825% were arrested with trafficking

(Note - not found guilty yet)

(8/4000x100 = 0.2%) 0.2% were actually charged.

(Not - found guilty and sent down)

Now, we would love to actually know what the estimated number of active prostitues were (bet its much higher) so you could produce a more accurate figure, which would send the % even lower.

When calculating %'s the most significant thing is to question what the actual numbers used are representing to accurately understand what your % actually means. being carefull that someone has not "re-wrapped" that % to to match their own goal/objective/ends.

(The only thing we worried about is having said that and we are only half way through reading all the posts on this forum which is quite extensive, before making such a post).

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Good to see Lord Faulkner doesn't mince his words in that piece from The Register:

"Government research on the topic is bogus: this legislation is based on a lie."

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"(8/4000x100 = 0.2%) 0.2% were actually charged.

(Not - found guilty and sent down)"

sorry typo, "not" should be "note" ....

(8/4000x100 = 0.2%) 0.2% were actually charged.

(Note - found guilty and sent down)

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If the Bill is defeated at the second reading it can progress no further.

If the Bill is passed on the second reading there is typically two to four weeks before the committee stage then another two weeks before the report stage which is usually immediately followed by the third reading. If passed at the third reading it then passes to the House of Lords where it goes through similar stages and may be amended and passed back to the House of Commons.

You can see the progress and access all the amendments etc. here:

http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2008-09/policingandcrime.html

Committee dates announced as next Tuesday and Thursday, 27 & 29 January.

Things seem to be moving fast, possibly due to thin programme this session.

When will Brown call a General Election?

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Committee dates announced as next Tuesday and Thursday, 27 & 29 January.

I notice they have just added today as a Committee date as well

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I notice they have just added today as a Committee date as well

General Committees: Appointments

The Committee of Selection nominates Members to serve on General Committees (and certain Members to serve on Grand Committees).

34 Policing and Crime Bill Committee

(1) Chairmen: Sir Nicholas Winterton and Hugh Bayley

(2) Members: Mr Ian Austin, Dr Roberta Blackman-Woods, James Brokenshire, Mr Simon Burns, Mr Alan Campbell, Mr Ian Cawsey, Mr Vernon Coaker, Mrs Nadine Dorries, Jim Fitzpatrick, Dr Evan Harris, Paul Holmes, Ms Sally Keeble, Miss Julie Kirkbride, Mr David Ruffley, Lynda Waltho and Phil Wilson.

35 Policing and Crime Bill (Programming Sub-Committee)

Members: Mr Ian Austin, Mr Simon Burns, Mr Vernon Coaker, Paul Holmes, Mr David Ruffley, Lynda Waltho and Phil Wilson.

Most names are unknown to me, Nadine DorriesĀ© however delivered a good speech in the last debate - see transcript or this video @ 06:09:35

http://www.parliamentlive.tv/Main/VideoPlayer.aspx?meetingId=3133&rel=ok

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What happened to Keith Vaz? He was the chairman of a releveant committee and sounded quite sceptical of the bill?

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