pabulum

Fears gonorrhoea becoming untreatable

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Just to help the 'It'll never happen to me and if it does They can cure it' brigade to think twice. Or even once.

The World Health Organisation is to meet next week to consider the growing threat from a sexually transmitted infection which has developed resistance to most known antibiotics.

Gonorrhoea is the second most common sexually transmitted disease in the UK after chlamydia with 16,629 cases recorded in 2008. Anecdotal reports of resistant cases from around the country suggest the infection could become "extremely difficult to treat", according to Professor Cathy Ison of the Health Protection Agency's Centre for Infection.

....or so says an article in today's 'Independent'.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/fears-gonorrhoea-becoming-untreatable-1930654.html

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Things like this usually happen because people stop taking the anti-biotics after the symptoms go and before the end of the course of treatment. This means the disease is still present and learns to mutate so that it builds resistance to traditional ABs, creating a sort of "superbug".

Bet the link already says that, and I've wasted 2 minutes typing this.

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Things like this usually happen because people stop taking the anti-biotics after the symptoms go and before the end of the course of treatment. This means the disease is still present and learns to mutate so that it builds resistance to traditional ABs, creating a sort of "superbug".

Bet the link already says that, and I've wasted 2 minutes typing this.

True for TB but gonorrhoea is normally treated with a single dose of antibiotics, so if there's been underdosage it's the doc's fault, not the patient's...

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True for TB but gonorrhoea is normally treated with a single dose of antibiotics, so if there's been underdosage it's the doc's fault, not the patient's...

Ah, I didn't know that (having never had it). Good point, then.

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Things like this usually happen because people stop taking the anti-biotics after the symptoms go and before the end of the course of treatment. This means the disease is still present and learns to mutate so that it builds resistance to traditional ABs, creating a sort of "superbug".

Bet the link already says that, and I've wasted 2 minutes typing this.

It is the misuse of anti biotics. Read an article that says the Chinese are worse than us for taking anti biotics when they have a cold or sore throat.

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Just to help the 'It'll never happen to me and if it does They can cure it' brigade to think twice. Or even once.

The World Health Organisation is to meet next week to consider the growing threat from a sexually transmitted infection which has developed resistance to most known antibiotics.

Gonorrhoea is the second most common sexually transmitted disease in the UK after chlamydia with 16,629 cases recorded in 2008. Anecdotal reports of resistant cases from around the country suggest the infection could become "extremely difficult to treat", according to Professor Cathy Ison of the Health Protection Agency's Centre for Infection.

....or so says an article in today's 'Independent'.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/fears-gonorrhoea-becoming-untreatable-1930654.html

It won't be untreatable, just more difficult i.e they'll need to use several antibiotics and more than 1 dose. It won't mean that you'll never be able to get rid of it.

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I think that the thrust of the article is that the effectiveness of the single dose is declining as the bug mutates to develop resistance. It is increasingly necessary to have to use a mixture of drugs, and that is also not as effective as it should be. The same pattern is emerging which could be seen during the development of MRSA.

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I think that the thrust of the article is that the effectiveness of the single dose is declining as the bug mutates to develop resistance. It is increasingly necessary to have to use a mixture of drugs, and that is also not as effective as it should be. The same pattern is emerging which could be seen during the development of MRSA.

Exactly---- & there are more alternative antibiotics against MRSA

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It is the misuse of anti biotics. Read an article that says the Chinese are worse than us for taking anti biotics when they have a cold or sore throat.

Well, I wasn't far off then. You should take ABs if really necessary and FINISH THE COURSE. Drs who prescribe ABs for routine viruses (ie colds) or sore throats need to go back to med school.

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I think that the thrust of the article is that the effectiveness of the single dose is declining as the bug mutates to develop resistance. It is increasingly necessary to have to use a mixture of drugs, and that is also not as effective as it should be. The same pattern is emerging which could be seen during the development of MRSA.

And go back 15 or more years ago, and it was standard practise to have 2 weeks of 2 different ABs (rather than ONE dose) to treat chlamydia OR gonorrhoea, and even that often didn't clear the diseases.

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Only last week we had one to do with neck and throat cancers due to oral sex. To me the timing of the release of these articles feels suspicious. Just as HH is trying to get her draconian measures off the ground.

Paranoid I maybe but this is the god brigade trying to rein in sexual freedoms.

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....Just as HH is trying to get her draconian measures off the ground.

Paranoid I maybe but this is the god brigade trying to rein in sexual freedoms.

I somehow doubt that HH's views, nor any divine ones that there might be, carry much weight with the World Health Organisation.

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Exactly---- & there are more alternative antibiotics against MRSA

There's one, as far as I know. And the side effects are not nice.

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I somehow doubt that HH's views, nor any divine ones that there might be, carry much weight with the World Health Organisation.

No, agreed, but her views, and those of her gang, do carry a lot of weight with journalists, alas.

Ah! Our free press!

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Things like this usually happen because people stop taking the anti-biotics after the symptoms go and before the end of the course of treatment. This means the disease is still present and learns to mutate so that it builds resistance to traditional ABs, creating a sort of "superbug".

Bet the link already says that, and I've wasted 2 minutes typing this.

exactly right - this was how mrsa came about - its the remaining bacteria that have only been "damaged" and not fully killed that mutate and become immune to an antibiotic. Yes antibiotics are overprescribed, but the greatest misuse is in agriculture with the routine prophalactic antibiotics given to animals!

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Do animals get the clap, then? :eek:

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lol - no they just pump them with antibiotics so they dont get infections that might reduce their growth and value!!!

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A bastion to pleasure and a net to infection but alas, the humble condom is there to protect us.

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And go back 15 or more years ago, and it was standard practise to have 2 weeks of 2 different ABs (rather than ONE dose) to treat chlamydia OR gonorrhoea, and even that often didn't clear the diseases.

From the 1940s till the 1980s gonorrhoea was treated with single dose penicillin; later ciprofloxacin was used, again as a single dose; latterly cephalosporins have been used, again as a single dose.

A second antibiotic may be given simultaneously to cover concurrent Chlamydia/non-specific urethritis---- either single dose azithromycin or (15 years ago) ONE week of a tetracycline.

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There's one, as far as I know. And the side effects are not nice.

Not quite so bad:

Abstract from Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2007 Sep 15;45 Suppl 3:S184-90.

Vancomycin remains the reference standard for the treatment of systemic infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, as a result of limited tissue distribution, as well as the emergence of isolates with reduced susceptibility and in vitro resistance to vancomycin, the need for alternative therapies that target MRSA has become apparent. New treatment options for invasive MRSA infections include linezolid, daptomycin, tigecycline, and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Additionally, a number of new anti-MRSA compounds are in development, including novel glycopeptides (dalbavancin, telavancin, and oritavancin), ceftobiprole, and iclaprim. The present article will review clinical issues surrounding the newly marketed and investigational agents with activity against MRSA

Five anti-MRSA drugs by my count, highlighted bold; with 5 more in development, italicised.

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