punter992005

interesting story

4 posts in this topic

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/coventry_and_warwickshire/10184064.stm

Someone in another thread was asking about cautions and whether they could be appealed - this was due to the possibility of being railroaded into getting a caution for the new offence; and whether they could be appealed, since by accepting a caution you're effectively pleading guilty.

The above story, although concerning a different offence, seems to confirm some peoples' fears that yes the police will take advantage of people to press for a caution where it's totally invalid, BUT it also shows that they can be overturned. Quite a story when you read it and I get the impression the police were just loving the opportunity to get another result esp. for such a juicy offence.

Remains to be seen what will happen with the new offence.

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/coventry_and_warwickshire/10184064.stm

Someone in another thread was asking about cautions and whether they could be appealed - this was due to the possibility of being railroaded into getting a caution for the new offence; and whether they could be appealed, since by accepting a caution you're effectively pleading guilty.

The above story, although concerning a different offence, seems to confirm some peoples' fears that yes the police will take advantage of people to press for a caution where it's totally invalid, BUT it also shows that they can be overturned. Quite a story when you read it and I get the impression the police were just loving the opportunity to get another result esp. for such a juicy offence.

Remains to be seen what will happen with the new offence.

Does, indeed, doesn't it? Unhappily for any of us (with our more than adequate command of English!!) who is daft enough to pop into one of the seedier dens where coerced women are likely to be found, I think that this case turned mostly on the victim being a Kurdish speaker (with, I think, limited english) who was made to take a caution without an interpreter being present.

The moral remains, I think, that any one daft enough to put himself in a den where "the new law" might be relevant, and who gets caught in a raid, needs to swiftly develop some intelligence, refuse any caution, and wait to see if CPS reckon they've got enough evidence to prove the bits that they DO have to prove. I think that they will often live up to the name the Police gave them long ago, "The Can't Prosecute Service"!

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I am no supporter of the new Legislation but why why should an interpreter be provided. The matter ocurred in the United Kingdom where we speak English and the presumption should be that those that come here do also. Another waste of taxpayers money. :confused::mad::confused:

Does, indeed, doesn't it? Unhappily for any of us (with our more than adequate command of English!!) who is daft enough to pop into one of the seedier dens where coerced women are likely to be found, I think that this case turned mostly on the victim being a Kurdish speaker (with, I think, limited english) who was made to take a caution without an interpreter being present.

The moral remains, I think, that any one daft enough to put himself in a den where "the new law" might be relevant, and who gets caught in a raid, needs to swiftly develop some intelligence, refuse any caution, and wait to see if CPS reckon they've got enough evidence to prove the bits that they DO have to prove. I think that they will often live up to the name the Police gave them long ago, "The Can't Prosecute Service"!

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I am no supporter of the new Legislation but why why should an interpreter be provided. The matter ocurred in the United Kingdom where we speak English and the presumption should be that those that come here do also.

The blunt answer is ECHR Art 6 3(a) & (e)!

In criminal (not civil) matters we all have the right to have the details of what is alleged against us in a language which we can understand, and to have the free assistance of an interpreter in court.

If you pop off to Bulgaria, or Latvia, and fall foul of the law, will you be able to defend yourself, whether against a punting charge, or a driving offence, in the relevant local tongue?

In this case chummy was led to accept a caution for a sex offence, which had him on the sexual offenders' register, which can be really quite a mill-stone to have hung round one's neck!

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